A few weeks ago, we reported on another in a line of Missouri appellate decisions rejecting the ability of Missouri courts to try the claims of non-Missouri residents against non-Missouri manufacturers of baby powder not used in Missouri.  The next day a jury in the same trial court awarded billions in a trial of 22 baby powder users. This was all part of a long saga of litigation tourism to the Show Me State.

It turns out that some plaintiffs prefer to go ever upwards with their baby powder claims in New York state court. We are not talking about New York residents suing in their friendly neighborhood court, we are talking about litigation tourists coming to the Big Apple with hopes of big awards. The problem–for them–is that New York state courts are supposed to apply personal jurisdiction according to the same standards that the Missouri appellate courts and the United States Supreme Court have been lately. We received two very similar decisions from a friend of the blog, Thomas Kurland of Patterson Belknap, that address personal jurisdiction for claims against the manufacturers of baby powder by people with no particular connection to where they were suing. The difference from the baby powder cases from Missouri and New Jersey that we have discussed before is that these plaintiffs claimed mesothelioma from asbestos allegedly in baby powder they had used.

The first case, Hammock v. Avon Prods., Inc., No. 190215/2016, 2018 WL 3601393 (N.Y. Super. Ct. July 27, 2018), has been published and came out a few days before the second, Crozier v. Avon Prods., Inc., No. 190385/2016 (N.Y. Super. Ct. July 31, 2018). The issues and analyses were almost identical, so we will discuss them together and skip pinpoint cites. The plaintiff in Hammock claimed exposure to the decedent from use of baby powder on herself, her children, and patients where she worked over the span of more than 35 years. All of the exposure, and any purchasing the decedent did, occurred in Virginia, where she lived. The plaintiff in Crozier claimed use of baby powder and a related cosmetic product when she was an infant and a teenager.  All use and purchasing of the products was in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas.

Both plaintiffs brought suit in New York state court against a number of defendants. We report on the motion in each case of the manufacturer and distributor of the baby powder, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc., and its holding company parent. Neither of those entities was incorporated in New York, had its principal place of business in New York, or was registered to do business in New York. The subsidiary did not manufacture or develop the baby powder in New York. Despite these facts, the plaintiff in each case claimed the court could exercise general personal jurisdiction over both entities or, at least, should allow jurisdictional discovery to proceed.

Based on a straightforward application of Bauman, Walden, and BMS, the court rejected both general and specific personal jurisdiction in each case. On general jurisdiction, each plaintiff pointed to “several isolated events that Johnson & Johnson was involved in (including industry meeting that Johnson & Johnson employees attended in the 1970s, four (4) letters sent from Johnson & Johnson representatives to New York-based scientists, and two statements make to the New York Times).” This was clearly not enough, as “isolated” is not a synonym for “continuous” or “systematic,” both of which are required for contacts to establish general personal jurisdiction. While it is not clear that either plaintiff even offered an argument on specific jurisdiction, the court went ahead and addressed that issue anyway. With all alleged exposure in each case hundreds of miles away from New York, “there is no articulable nexus or substantial relationship between the J&J Entities’ New York conduct and the claims asserted.” Holding off on dismissal to allow for jurisdictional discovery was also not in the cards as any discovery either plaintiff could seek would be futile.

We say the plaintiffs were sent packing, but the truth is that we do not know about the substance or disposition of any claims against other defendants—as there appear to be based on the captions. There may be other defendants, maybe even ones over which New York could exercise general personal jurisdiction, who are alleged to be liable for some separate asbestos exposure that allegedly caused the respective plaintiffs’ alleged injuries. While we may be accused of being defense hacks—we were so labeled just yesterday—we do see the difficulty of picking the right place to sue multiple defendants who are not residents of the plaintiff’s state. Suing in New Jersey, for instance, would have allowed the court to exercise jurisdiction over the New Jersey defendants, but maybe not over defendants from New York or somewhere else. Of course, if there really were acts by the defendants that arguable created liability in the states where these plaintiffs used products and live(d), then a Hammock case in Virginia and a Crozier case in Texas might not have been caught in jurisdictional snags. They probably would have been removed to federal courts, however, and been subject to substantive law and procedures the plaintiff lawyers wished to avoid. So, before you say we have something against New York or some other litigation tourism destination, think about whether the plaintiffs who hit the road are looking for a fair venue or a favorable one.