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A complaint is a plaintiff’s opening argument.  It has to contain enough substance to get plaintiff out of the gate.  Plaintiff doesn’t have to necessarily prove anything in his complaint, but he has to have factual support to back up what he hopes to prove.  Logically, any fact added to a complaint is intended to

We aren’t pulling any punches.  We think Taylor v. Mentor Worldwide LLC, — F.3d –, 2019 WL 4941936 (11th Cir. Oct. 8, 2019) is a candidate to be one of this year’s DDL Blog bottom ten cases.  Not only was plaintiff’s expert allowed to change his opinion at trial, plaintiff was allowed to

The last baseball player to reach a .400 batting average for a season was Ted Williams in 1941.  In a sport that probably keeps more stats than any other, baseball sees records broken and milestones reached all the time.  Some marks, however, appear to be set in stone.  One of these is Ted Williams’s 1941

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

It’s not a long decision – but there’s still a lot to it.  Maybe that’s because there wasn’t a lot to plaintiff’s complaint. Regardless, Sharp v. St. Jude Medical, S.C., Inc., 2019 WL 3821895 (N.D.GA Aug. 14, 2019) makes some key defense rulings.