Bexis has lots of opinions on what’s wrong with mass-tort (especially drug/device) MDLs.  Heck, Bexis has even proposed amendments to the MDL statutes to correct the many severe problems that exist.  Now, Congress has before it possible statutory changes (not holding our breath) and Civil Rules Committee is looking into the same problems.  Maybe something will happen, although rules changes are notoriously protracted, and the cadre of MDL judges (15 judges control 18 MDLs that account for some 47% of the entire federal civil docket) and their plaintiff-side enablers will fight any attempts to curb MDL discretionary excesses.

In the midst of all this, the Duke Law School’s ongoing MDL best practices project held an invitation-only meeting recently, and Bexis was invited as one of the defense-oriented participants. This meeting was conducted under so-called “Chatham House” rules that preclude attributing particular statements to particular persons, so this post summarizing the meeting will not be of the “he said, she said” variety.

Early Dismissal of Meritless Cases

Defense-side participants produced a plethora of statistics that, in MDL after MDL, anywhere between 20% and 45% (eliminating outliers both ways) of all filed MDL cases are ultimately dismissed because the plaintiffs do not have evidence of the most basic information imaginable:  (a) that they actually encountered the product of the defendant being sued; (b) that they suffered one of the injuries that the MDL was about; and (c) that that the timing and amount of the plaintiff’s exposure was plausible under the plaintiffs’ own causation theories.  The missing information that was discussed was not anything expert-related, just product identification, injury, and plaintiffs fitting within whatever might be the plaintiffs’ own asserted parameters of causation.

Somewhat surprisingly, the plaintiff-side participants did not dispute the basic point – that meritless plaintiffs are widespread, running into the thousands of bogus plaintiffs in the larger MDLs.  Indeed, most of the plaintiff-side speakers professed not just their recognition of the meritless claim problem, but their own annoyance at this phenomenon.  The presence of large numbers of meritless cases artificially skewed who had what say on plaintiff steering committees, which partially depend on numbers of cases.  At the back end, meritless cases produced a bunch of left-over plaintiffs, abandoned by their counsel (who never intended to try cases), bumbling around pro se.

Not one plaintiff-side speaker denied that numerous meritless cases existed in MDLs, or that the absence of effective Rule 8/12/TwIqbal procedures encouraged meritless filings.  Evidently, the “park and ride” plaintiff-side lawyers who pump and dump cases into MDLs don’t attend conferences like this, or if they do, they keep quiet.  At most, the plaintiff-side speakers tolerated bad cases because they would “all work out in the end.”

The defense side vehemently rejected that no-harm, no-foul approach.  Defense participants argued that meritless cases weren’t harmless, but rather skewed MDL litigation from beginning to end – driving up discovery costs, forcing defendants to vet cases that plaintiffs should have done before filing, complicating random plaintiff selection for bellwether trials (more about such trials, below), and inflating settlement demands.  Artificially inflated plaintiff numbers increase the psychological impact of MDLs, given how those numbers find their way into press descriptions and plaintiff solicitations.  Masses of bogus plaintiffs also prevent proper resolution of “proportionality” issues in discovery, since they inflate P-side discovery arguments.

Further, FDA regulations do not contain any “bogus” case exception that would give defendants leeway not to report such cases in their adverse event filings.  Phony cases lead to phony “signals,” since even though adverse event reporting is (according to the FDA) not supposed to establish causation, plaintiff-side experts routinely try to misuse them − and sometimes get away with doing so.  When that happens, it’s garbage in, garbage out.  Inflated plaintiff numbers lead directly to inflated reports, so that meritless cases end up supporting junk science.  This effect is magnified by pleading that would be barred by TwIqbal in non-MDL cases that, such as use of “and/or,” that purport to sue multiple defendants when they could only have used one product, so that each defendant is obligated to report the “adverse event” to the FDA.

Matters livened up a bit further, with that morning’s report from 360 on the extreme position taken by plaintiffs in the Zofran MDL were taking on discovery – that discovery rules in MDLs only apply to defendants.  They were demanding that only 8 of over 400 plaintiffs should submit to any discovery at all – giving bogus Zofran cases a free ride all the way to remand.  The Zofran plaintiffs were so over the top that they even claimed an MDL judge lacked jurisdiction to order discovery.  That’s what Joe Biden would call “malarkey,” and not a single plaintiff-side speaker defended, let alone took, that position.

The problem of widespread filing of bogus cases received the most support for (or the least opposition to) a rules change to facilitate early dismissal of meritless cases.  A rules amendment would have to be simple – not a “Lone Pine” order, but rather something much more basic.  A plausible version could be along the lines of mandatory initial discovery, which exists in “pilot project” form in both the District of Arizona and the Northern District of Illinois.  The local rules could be adapted easily enough to require production of all evidence of product identification/exposure, diagnosis of an injury, and their relative timing within a relatively short fixed period (60-90 days would seem reasonable) after filing of a complaint.  If a plaintiff couldn’t produce any facts or records that plausibly establish a claim, then the meritless action would be dismissed with prejudice.  Maybe a mandatory initial disclosure rule would be limited to MDLs above a certain threshold (100? 500? 1000?) number of plaintiffs.

Defendants might have to compromise – giving something to get something.  MDLs are notorious for imposing onerous discovery obligations on defendants, anyway, so frankly our side wouldn’t be giving up much, except for possibly timing.  One possibility, discussed at the conference in a different context, could involve early technology-assisted review of some categories of electronic documents.  We like predictive coding anyway, so as long as the timing is doable, there might be the basis of a workable compromise here.

Another possibility would be to amend Rule 20 to prohibit joinder of plaintiffs in the same complaint who have nothing in common except suing over the same product.  These multi-plaintiff, misjoined complaints are the primary way that the “park and ride” lawyers file their cases, with practically no factual information about any of the plaintiffs.  Not only do these improper plaintiffs cheat courts out of filing fees, but they burden defendants with the expense of vetting the plaintiffs’ cases.  In addition to forbidding the practice, each misjoined plaintiff could also be required to make a non-refundable deposit into the MDL plaintiffs’ common benefit fund.

Finally, the issue of statute of limitations tolling agreements came up.  There could be a legitimate problem, when a plaintiff’s lawyer finds him/herself up against the statute of limitations with a new client.  We don’t have problems with tolling agreements, as long as they’re one-off, and not an excuse for further abuse.  Tolling agreements cannot be an excuse for rampant failure to vet claims – the example given being “I have 2000 new cases, can I have a tolling agreement for two years.”  Tolling agreements are only appropriate for a short period of time.  We think that the same 60-90 day period mentioned above should be long enough to accommodate counsel who would otherwise have a legitimate need for a tolling agreement.

Interlocutory Appeal of Significant MDL Rulings

Another candidate for a rules change – one meeting with significantly more opposition from our colleagues on the other side of the “v.’ – is the interlocutory appeal of the resolution of certain “significant” motions typically made in MDLs.  Such appeals would correct an imbalance in current practice in that, if defendants win a dispositive motion, it’s an appealable final order, but if defendants lose the same motion, no appeal is available because the denial isn’t final.  Thus, the litigation continues, and the dispositive issue is appealed, if at all, years later – after a bellwether trial or a remand (in the rare event that happens).

That imbalanced access to appellate review is acceptable in an individual case, because delay caused by piecemeal appeals isn’t offset by the need to get things right, right away.  What’s acceptable in a single case, becomes a much bigger problem when the downside of an erroneous denial of a dispositive motion could dispose of hundreds or thousands of cases, particularly an appeal much further down the road adds extraneous pressure to affirm, or else a great deal of MDL activity, based on the resolution defendants contend is erroneous, goes down the drain.

Attorneys on the plaintiffs’ side – as was the case throughout the conference – were content with the status quo.  They pointed to existing certification procedures, but current procedures require the assent of the trial judge that denied the motion in the first place.  If denial is intended to force settlement, which is often the case, that assent won’t be forthcoming.  Plaintiffs pointed to the New Jersey Accutane litigation which has (in)famously been around for some fifteen years.  But that analogy is poor.  Most, if not all, of the delay in Accutane is not due interlocutory appeals, but rather from an prior judge’s extremely poor bellwether trial performance (almost every trial verdict was been reversed), or from appeals concerning the grant of dispositive motions – neither of which have any bearing on the current proposal for a Rule 23(f)-like equivalent permitting interlocutory appeals from motion denials in MDLs whether or not the MDL judge wants to allow it.

Ironically, the Rule 23(f) analogy was attacked by the plaintiff side as a bad analogy, because class actions were mostly “negative value” cases that, unlike mass torts, would go away without certification.  We think the analogy, while not perfect, is better than the other side will admit, for reasons discussed in more detail when we turn to bellwether trials.  Lawyers are, by nature, competitive, and the raised stakes of mass tort MDLs only exacerbates that tendency.  Thus, both sides – but in particular the plaintiffs – pour more money into bellwether trials than the individual cases could possibly be worth.  In that way, bellwethers become “negative value” cases, too.

Once again, a bit of serendipity strengthened the defense arguments.  Just the day before, the Fifth Circuit reversed the bellwether trial verdict in the first of several consolidated trials in the Pinnacle Hip MDL. See In re DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc., Pinnacle Hip Implant Product Liability Litigation, ___ F.3d ___, 2018 WL 1954759 (5th Cir. April 25, 2018).  This was the same MDL where the defendants had tried everything to obtain appellate review of the trial court’s erroneous rulings, including mandamus.  Now, something like seven years of MDL activity in Pinnacle Hip has come to just about naught, largely because no interlocutory appeals process existed to provide timely review of repeated erroneous rulings.

We have to admit, though, the other side has a point that it would be difficult to create a one-size-fits-all interlocutory appeal rule defining exactly what “significant” MDL rulings would be subject to its purview.  Preemption, for sure − nobody on either side disputed that a single preemption motion could be dispositive of so much (up to and including “all”) of an MDL to qualify.  Everything else was subject to considerable debate.  Some Daubert motions can have the same MDL-wide preclusive effect; our 2016 top ten cases post discusses two (Mirena and Lipitor) of these (three (Zoloft) if you count the honorable mentions), but lots of other Daubert motions in MDLs would not come close.

Then there’s everything else. Choice of law was mentioned, so were punitive damages.  The jurisdictional issue in Pinnacle Hip was critical, but most MDL judges aren’t that overreaching.  So defining “significant” for the purposes of a rules change could well pose complex problems.

Having thought about all that, however, se say, “why bother?” Let defense lawyers in the particular MDL decide.  Call it the “upon further review” rule if you want.  In the NFL, the rules allow coaches a set number of challenges to just about any on-field calls, and if the team wins a challenge they get another one, up to some absolute limit.  NFL coaches get to pick what calls they consider important enough to challenge.  Let counsel do the same for MDL interlocutory review.  Preemption orders should be appealable, and a set number (probably two or three) of other orders could be subject to interlocutory review at each separately represented defendant’s option.  If the defendant wins the appeal, it gets another challenge.

We don’t think that approach will result in an undue number of appeals – especially since the Supreme Court just reduced the appellate courts’ workload by throwing out Alien Torts Claims Act cases against corporations, creating some give.  Delay might be a more serious concern, but as with Rule 23(f), the MDL isn’t being stayed, so discovery and other activity would continue in the meantime.

Another issue raised, which would be beyond the control of the federal rules, is whether interlocutory appeals would sufficiently delay MDLs so as to encourage plaintiffs to file in state court.  News flash – plaintiffs have been avoiding federal court for as long as we can remember.  In one of Bexis’ first MDLs, some 1500 Bone Screw plaintiffs tried to hide out in state court in Tennessee (where the target defendant was “at home” jurisdictionally).  They might even have gotten away with that, had Tennessee not had an unusually short one-year personal injury statute of limitations, which tripped up plaintiffs after they agreed to a universal discovery date that was more than a year before they filed all those multi-plaintiff complaints.  See Maestas v. Sofamor Danek Group, Inc., 33 S.W.3d 805 (Tenn. 2000) (plaintiffs lose on cross-jurisdictional class action tolling; all 1500 cases dismissed).  One more reason for plaintiffs to stay out of federal court doesn’t mean anything.  If anything, avoiding federal court is harder now than before because the Supreme Court decided to enforce constitutional limits on personal jurisdiction.

Bellwether Trials

There was considerable discussion of bellwether trials, but we have doubts that rules could solve the problems that were mentioned.  Our view is to interpret the MDL statute as written, and restrict MDLs to “coordinated or consolidated pretrial proceedings.”  28 U.S.C. §1407(a) (emphasis added).  A textualist approach to the MDL statute would, and we think should, mean no trials, “bellwether” or otherwise, in the MDL transferee court.  Simple.  No rules change needed.

But totally contrary to decades of MDL practice.  Don’t hold your breath – although if someone wants to preserve it for appeal, this issue could be the next Lexecon.

There was some discussion of how bellwether plaintiffs are selected.  The Manual for Complex Litigation favors random selection.  MCL §22.315.  We also lean towards random selection, although we recognize that the other side can game even a random system by either filing, or not filing, certain types of cases in the MDL.  So even random selection needs to be policed to prevent plaintiffs from attempting to skew the result.

We also think that, if the rules were changed to facilitate the early dismissal of facially meritless claims, that would go a long way to solving the problems with random selection.  Right now, any random selection process necessarily exposes the prevalence of meritless cases, so that plaintiffs are loathe to agree to what, abstractly, is the most statistically valid method of yielding a representative selection of cases.

Ensuring “representativeness” was also discussed, but we frankly think that’s futile.  As someone pointed out, “random does not necessarily mean representative.”  Even what might at the beginning be the most representative of cases ceases to be representative once both sides pour more resources into preparing and trying that case than it could possibly be worth if being tried outside of the MDL.  We agree with the comment of one of the plaintiff-side speakers that “spending a million to win $500,000 is not an economic business model.”  Both sides committing extraordinary resources to a bellwether trial is a sure way to ensure that the case for that reason alone ceases to have any representative value.

On the plaintiff side, keeping the business model economic, under MDL circumstances, only encourages the reduction of representativeness.  Instead, we see plaintiffs focused on “ringing the bell” – adding punitive damages or consolidated plaintiffs to the mix to make the case harder to defend.  That’s the practical (as opposed to the textual) reason we oppose bellwether trials.  At minimum, as we’ve discussed before, defendants should take care to craft any Lexecon waivers to exclude punitive damages or consolidations.  We didn’t hear any proposed rules changes that would meaningfully improve the bellwether trial system.

Third-Party Litigation Funding

The group discussed a proposal, pending in Congress, requiring automatic disclosure of third-party funding agreements.  Interestingly, plaintiff-side speakers admitted that they demand disclosure of that kind of information themselves when setting up their steering committees, because their membership must be able to “take the heat,” and lawyers controlled by a “hedge fund” can’t be shaping their strategy.  To at least some plaintiffs’ speakers, third-party funding meant “a dummy in the room and a ventriloquist outside.”  One of the judges in attendance likewise thought that disclosure of third-party funding was a good idea to prevent conflicts.  If both plaintiffs and the judiciary favor disclosure is necessary to prevent conflicts, then it is hard to justify not routinely disclosing it to all sides, as insurance is disclosed.

Proponents of such funding stated that it was only a “professionalization” of activities that had long gone on the plaintiff side of litigation.  Perhaps, but that justification brings the response of “what, then, do you have to hide?”  If third party litigation funding is truly professionalized, then again, it resembles insurance, which is subject to automatic disclosure.  To be considered “mainstream,” third-party litigation funders need to act the part.

Proponents also raised the issue of disclosure of confidential work product if funding agreements are discoverable.  This concern seems like a red herring to us, as the contracts are easily drafted to omit any attorney evaluations of litigation.

Proponents also distinguished two uses of litigation funding. The first, which is more similar to corporate litigation funding arrangements, involves loans to plaintiff-side law firms, secured either by their interests in specific litigation or by interests in their entire pending litigation inventory.  These tend to have lower interest rates and involve less influence over litigation strategies or settlement decisions.  Disclosure of such funding is, however, essential to gauging the relative resources of both sides in determining who is going to pay for what discovery in MDL situations.  Plaintiffs should not be able to play at being David when their funding lines of credit are actually Goliath-sized.

The flip side is what was sometimes referred to as “payday lending” litigation funding − where the plaintiff is receiving what amounts to an advance on possible recoveries.  A lengthy discussion was had of claimed abuses – covering the NFL concussion litigation and the recent New York Times exposé of what has gone on in the Pelvic Mesh litigation.  In either case, immediate disclosure of litigation funding agreements would have prevented, or at least reduced, improper conduct, as transparency in funding would have raised red flags about the terms and timing of the agreements in question.  Suspicious agreements could then have brought to the court’s attention, or been the subject of additional discovery into their provenance.

Additional discovery was another aspect of the third party litigation funding debate.  Proponents argued, with some force, that disclosure of agreements would not be the end of matters.  They raised potential use of discovery into litigation funding as a means of opening yet “another front” in MDL litigation and attempting to disrupt the opposing side’s ability to finance itself.  We think that concern could be valid, but is easily addressed.  Disclosure of insurance hasn’t (except in Louisiana) led to insurance companies being sued directly by opponents of their insureds.  The work product issue raised above provides a useful analogy with, anything beyond the contract subject to a similar “good cause shown” and “otherwise unavailable” standard.  There is no inherent reason that such funding should be the source of additional discovery, but requiring prior court approval serves as another check.

Finally, just as plaintiffs want a look at their opponent’s insurance to know how much defendants have available for settlement, or whether the other side has sufficiently deep pockets, defendants should be able to make similar judgments based on plaintiffs’ third-party litigation funding.  A plaintiff who has to satisfy a funder is unlikely to take in settlement an amount that the defendant believes is reasonable if that means zero dollars in the plaintiff’s pocket.  In this respect, discovery of litigation funding is justifiable for the same reason as third-party litigation liens.  Very few plaintiffs would argue that insurance, health care, and other liens can be kept secret from the other side.  Anyone who has a piece of the potential recovery is, in practice a real party in interest who should be at the table and whose identity should be known to all.  All sides should know who is the ventriloquist and who is the dummy.

*          *         *         *

Several other topics were also discussed at the Duke conference, but they overwhelmingly involved the plaintiff side − composition of a plaintiff-side steering committee, judicial efforts to increase diversity on such steering committees, and common fund assessments.  But this post is already quite long, and these other topics are of less interest to our defense-oriented audience.

On Wednesday, the Fifth Circuit was finally able speak to what’s been going on in a Dallas courtroom that has racked up over $1.7 billion—that’s billion—in jury verdicts over the last two years in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL. And the Fifth Circuit entered the room loudly. It ordered a new trial of the plaintiff’s very first victory, the one that produced a half-billion dollar verdict. The court did not hold back, making it perfectly clear that it vacated the judgment due to “the district court’s evidentiary errors and [plaintiffs’ attorney Mark] Lanier’s deception.” Slip Op. at 6.

The “evidentiary errors” have been a controversial part of these MDL trials since the time of our first post about them two years ago. Even then, we were struck by the “number and nature” of these evidentiary rulings, which in the aggregate suggested “an almost uninterrupted flow of unduly prejudicial and irrelevant information to the jury.”  The Fifth Circuit now agrees, highlighting two of them as the basis to order a new trial.

First, the Saddam Hussein evidence. Slip Op. at 43-46. That’s right. The court allowed evidence concerning Saddam Hussein into a hip implant trial. Its decision was based on a deferred prosecution agreement, one in which J&J took responsibility for the actions of affiliates who had bribed officials in the Iraqi government. These affiliates had nothing to do with the Pinnacle Hip Implant device. Regardless, after defendants elicited testimony on their own positive internal culture and marketing, the district court ruled that the defendants had thereby “opened the door” to Saddam Hussein, the deferred prosecution agreement and all sorts of other stuff. With light now green, the plaintiffs’ attorney thereafter featured Saddam Hussein and bribes and prosecution in his questioning of witnesses and closing argument. Mind you, this was a hip implant medical device trial.

The Fifth Circuit rejected the trial court’s “open door” ruling. It held that “the rules of evidence do not simply evaporate when one party opens the door on an issue.” Id. at 44. Prior bad acts cannot be used to convince a jury that defendants acted as wrongdoers in the case before it. Id. The Fifth Circuit held, however, that the plaintiffs’ attorney asked the jury to do just that. To illustrate this, the Fifth Circuit quoted the paragraph below from plaintiffs’ closing argument. Note that the italicized emphasis in the paragraph was placed there by the Fifth Circuit, as was the single word “Indeed” after that paragraph:

If you go back and look at the DPA, that’s the deferred prosecution agreement where the company paid money one time because of kickbacks to doctors in America, the other time because of the bribes to Saddam Hussein’s government, the bribes in Greece, Romania, Poland and other places where they were bribing people to put in . . . their products. The DPA has [J&J] admitting its responsibility in it. J&J is admitting that they’re responsible. They have already taken this issue out of your hands realistically. That alone is a winner. . . . [J&J] has admitted their responsibility for this. That ought to be enough.

Indeed.

Id. at 45. The Fifth Circuit wrote that this closing argument and the earlier questioning “tainted the result by inviting the jury to infer guilt based on no more than prior bad acts . . . . That alone provides grounds for a new trial.” Id.

The second evidentiary ruling rejected by the Fifth Circuit was the trial court’s decision to allow plaintiffs to use hearsay in a resignation letter from a DePuy employee alleging racism within the company. Slip Op. 46-48. Again, this was a hip implant trial. Calling it a “spectacle,” the Fifth Circuit ruled that reading this letter to the jury “refocused its attention on serious, and seriously distracting, claims of racial discrimination that defendants had no meaningful opportunity to rebut via cross-examination. This spectacle fortifies that a new trial is required.”

These evidentiary rulings alone were enough to upend the judgment. But there were more. As we laid out in our previous posts, the trial court made multiple other questionable evidentiary rulings that allowed questioning and argument on things like suicide, cancer, connections to the tobacco industry, transvaginal mesh suits, and so on. Having already overturned the judgment, the Fifth Circuit declined to address these other evidentiary rulings. But it did warn the trial court to “weigh carefully the application of Rule 403 and 404(b)” when considering these issues at future trials. Slip Op. at n. 71.

Next, the Fifth Circuit found additional grounds to overturn the judgment due to what it called “deception” by the plaintiffs’ attorney regarding plaintiffs’ experts, something we wrote about last year. Plaintiffs classified two of its experts as “non-retained,” meaning not paid. At trial, plaintiffs’ attorney contrasted this with what he called the “bought testimony” of the defendants’ expert. The problem is, however, that plaintiffs’ experts were “bought” too. Before trial, plaintiffs’ attorney donated $10,000 to St. Rita’s Catholic School, the favorite charity of one of the two experts. More blatantly, after trial, plaintiffs paid $65,000 in total to the two experts.

It would be difficult to overemphasize how hard the Fifth Circuit came down on this, labeling it “deception.” Slip Op. at 6. The court was clearly displeased. Its opinion (see pages 49-57) is littered with snide comments. Noting that Mr. Lanier mentioned to the jury that he had shared the “best apple pie in the world” with one of the two experts, the court wrote, “St. Rita’s and the $10,000 check went unmentioned.” Id. at 50. After quoting Mr. Lanier contrasting the supposedly “bought testimony” of the defendants’ experts with the supposed “real life” testimony of his two experts, the Fifth Circuit wrote: “As between ‘real life’ and ‘bought testimony,’ [the jury] chose the former by a margin of $502 million. But that choice was a false one, manufactured entirely by Lanier.” Id. at 52.

With the unmistakable intent to drive its point home, the Fifth Circuit clarified in just about every way possible that this type of maneuvering was improper:

This is the rare case in which counsel’s deceptions were sufficiently obvious, egregious, and impactful to penetrate the layers of deference that would ordinarily shield against reversal.

Lanier’s failure to disclose the donation, and his repeated insistence that Morrey Sr. had absolutely no pecuniary interest in testifying, were unequivocally deceptive.

Lawyers cannot engage with a favorable expert, pay him “for his time,” then invite him to testify as a purportedly “non-retained” neutral party. That is deception, plain and simple.

We find, by the “clear and convincing” evidence of common sense, that Lanier misled the jury in creating the impression that Morrey Jr. had neither pecuniary incentive nor motive in testifying. Neither our double deference nor counsel’s specious reasoning can alter that conclusion.

Calculated or not, falsehoods marred plaintiffs’ victory. The Verdict cannot stand.

Got it. This lambasting by the Fifth Circuit could change the game in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL. Proper boundaries may now be back in place, or at least some of them. There are more appeals to come, and they involve serious procedural and jurisdictional issues that were front and center in the two trials that followed this one. In fact, there may be more to come from this opinion, at least from us, as it also granted DePuy judgment on two plaintiffs’ failure to warn claims and J&J judgment on plaintiffs’ aiding and abetting claims—something for us to address another day.

One thing is already clear from this opinion, though. Two years of this MDL may have been wasted on defective jury trials. But, if a reset is needed, it must be done. The goal of an MDL is not to hammer defendants with every possible negative piece of evidence, relevant or not, so as to produce large verdicts. It is to establish a framework under which the parties can properly litigate and value the hundreds or thousands of cases within a complex mass tort. The Fifth Circuit’s opinion is an important step toward that proper construct.

When we described for you (here and here) the briefing on the appeal of the half-billion-dollar verdict in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL’s second bellwether trial, we left out maybe the most intriguing issue. This is one the likes of which we have not seen before: the case of the unpaid experts who were paid. Well, not really paid. They received a “thank you.” In the form of money. So, yeah, paid. This unpaid paid expert issue was serious enough to trigger a motion for a new trial from defendants under FRCP 60(b) (3). The denial of that motion is now part of the appeal.

Defendants’ opening appellate brief describes the issue in some detail. At trial, plaintiffs’ counsel repeatedly argued or elicited testimony in front of the jury that two of plaintiffs’ expert witnesses were not paid, contrasting them to defendants’ experts whom plaintiffs’ counsel described as giving “bought testimony.” If true, we see why plaintiffs’ counsel would stress this point to the jury. But . . . During depositions of those two experts for the next bellwether trial, defendants learned that they were in fact paid: one received $30,000; the other received $35,000 and a promise from plaintiffs’ counsel to donate $10,000 to the expert’s preferred charity. They sure seem like paid experts.

Plaintiffs try to clear this up in their opposition brief. In many respects, they only create confusion. They argue that, for instance, it was the defendants who paid one of these two experts—a full $10,000. But that expert was also a treater of two plaintiffs, and he appears to have charged defendants, as many treating doctors do, for appearing at two fact depositions about those plaintiffs. That is not an expert issue. After that detour, Plaintiffs’ lawyers concede that they did, in fact, pay these two experts the $65,000 and send the $10,000 to the charity. But they stress that they paid the experts after trial, that they agreed to pay the charity after the expert’s testimony, and that the experts did not ask for the payments. Instead, they claim that plaintiffs’ counsel decided after trial on their own—that’s sua sponte for us lawyers—to make the payments to the experts and the charity. They did this to show “appreciation” to the experts and to say “thank you.” Setting aside that this could raise other concerns—that is, paying an expert based on success—plaintiffs use this as a basis to argue they were well within bounds to tell the jury that the experts were not paid. . . . It’s starting to feel a little uncomfortable in here.

In their reply brief, defendants note, as they did in their opening brief, that one of the experts flat out admitted at his deposition that he always expected to be paid for his testimony at trial (and brushed off, because apparently they had to, the idea that the expert might have thought the defendants would pay him for testifying against them at trial). They also point out that the record shows that the promise to pay $10,000 to one of the expert’s preferred charity was made before trial

At oral argument, things got even more interesting—believe it or not. The court asked plaintiffs’ counsel to produce the $10,000 check to charity. Plaintiffs did so in a filing. Here it is, including the check and plaintiffs’ counsel’s explanatory letter. Take a close look at the check. It is dated December 4, 2015. That’s five weeks before the January 11, 2016 trial. Not only the promise, but the actual payment, came before trial. . . . It’s getting even more uncomfortable in here. Feel free to read the explanation in plaintiffs’ counsel’s letter. And here is the response from defendants.

So what can we make of all this. We really don’t know. But we do know one thing. No matter what you say about the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL, it’s never boring. The Fifth Circuit will issue its opinion soon enough.

A lot of time is spent in litigation on discovery. As tedious and non-exciting as it often is, cases can be won or lost depending on what happens during discovery. So, it’s not to be taken lightly. When we find ourselves arguing to the court about discovery, however, it is often without being able to point to much precedential case law. That’s because many courts simply rule from the bench perhaps entering only minute orders. And if case management orders are entered they often don’t rise to the level of being published, even electronically. We are then left scouring dockets looking for rulings or calling our colleagues hoping someone has an order that is helpful. So, we really appreciate when a helpful discovery ruling grabs our attention and we can in turn alert our readers to it.

One of the reasons that more routine discovery decisions don’t generate many opinions is that the rulings frequently turn on case specifics and common sense as opposed to more traditional legal analysis. That’s true of today’s decision. A lengthy order entered in the Abilify MDL setting forth essentially a list of decisions on multiple motions made by both plaintiffs and defendants. Certainly some are more case specific and not really worth much of a mention, so what follows is a list of the more general and most helpful rulings:

  • Confidentiality: The court allowed the parties to provisionally seal documents filed with their Daubert briefing and then at the conclusion of the briefing, the party who sealed the document had to show cause why the document should remain sealed. Defendants argued to keep certain very common categories of documents confidential:
    • Clinical case reports/adverse event reports: Defendants argued that these documents contain confidential patient identifying information and personal medical information. These aren’t plaintiffs – they are people who participated in studies or for whom an AER was prepared. They absolutely have a right to an expectation of privacy, not to mention the company has an obligation to protect that privacy. The court agreed – no public interest. In re Abilify Prods. Liab. Litig., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 161660, at *7-8 (N.D. Fla. Sep. 29, 2017).
    • Internal company documents: Defendants sought to maintain confidentiality of several categories of internal, non-public documents and the court agreed as to most. Specifically, the court found that all of the following should remain under seal: “standard operating procedures, non-public regulatory submissions, drafts of non-public regulatory submissions, or internal communications regarding the pharmacovigilance process.” Id. at *9. All things plaintiffs like to use to try the case in the media. As to SOPs, the court concluded they are proprietary and developed by the company at considerable expense. With respect to the rest, disclosure “would have a chilling effect on the pharmacovigilance process.” Id. Keeping the pharmacovigilance process confidential actually enables manufacturers to participate in the process in a “frank, open, and honest” way. Id.
    • Expert reports and testimony: Here the court was unwilling to seal expert reports and transcripts across the board. They have to be redacted to the extent they discuss any of the documents or information that the court said should remain confidential. Id. at *10-11.
  • Privilege: Plaintiffs complained that they were unable to assess defendants’ claims of privilege as to its documents because defendants were not producing privilege logs simultaneous with their document productions. Defendants correctly noted that simultaneous privilege logs would significantly slow production down – a production would have to wait the finalizing of the log before it could be produced. The court agreed.  Simultaneous production would be inefficient. Id. at *17-19.
  • Document Retention Policies: Plaintiffs want them, defendants objected. Court ruled: “in the absence of any suggestion of spoliation Defendants’ document retention policies are not relevant.” Id. at *24.
  • Other Drugs: Plaintiffs’ discovery requests included documents about other similar drugs, claiming the information would go to defendants’ knowledge. The court sustained defendants’ objection on the grounds of relevance and proportionality. Id. at *25. While other drugs in the same class may be similar, they were developed later in time, have different mechanisms, and different indications – making them marginally relevant. When you balance only marginal relevance against the issues involved in the litigation – and what we assume to be massive discovery already taking place as to the actual drug at issue — we think the court reached a sound conclusion regarding proportionality to the needs of the case.
  • Trial Pool Discovery: Plaintiffs requested many different types of information, including financial information relevant to sales representatives, physicians, and other consultants. Defendants sought to limit that discovery to just the individuals related to the cases being worked up as trial bellwethers. Again the court agreed. For example, plaintiffs’ request to know about payments and incentives to sales representatives and doctors should be narrowly tailored to those doctors who treated the bellwether plaintiffs and the sales representatives who called on those doctors. Id. at *26-27. The same applied to other categories of “liability” discovery that were more appropriately limited to the bellwether cases. “Expanding the scope to all Plaintiffs would be a Herculean task and impossible to complete in the time frame set by the Court.” Id. at *28.

All in all the rulings were very defense-friendly and provide some good cites for your next motion to compel or motion to quash.

As we publish this post, lawyers in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL are gathering in the Bob Casey Courthouse in Houston or in coffee shops, breakfast cafés or law offices nearby awaiting the argument to come.  At 10:00 a.m., the arguing starts.  The Fifth Circuit will officially begin to consider whether to issue a writ of mandamus telling the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL Court in Dallas that it cannot exercise personal jurisdiction over the upcoming September bellwether trial involving eight New York plaintiffs. The Fifth Circuit will tackle the substance of the appeal—did defendants waive their personal jurisdiction defense as to those eight cases and, in fact, as to all cases in the MDL when they gave a waiver in connection with the first two bellwether trials? Maybe more important, the Fifth Circuit will tackle procedure—are these the type of rare circumstances that require it to issues a writ of mandamus?

We first posted on this petition to the Fifth Circuit on August 8.  Defendants’ petition argued—fairly convincingly—that the context of their waivers, and the language of the waivers themselves, made clear that they applied only to the cases selected for the previous bellwether trials that were upcoming at the time that the waivers were made, and not to all MDL cases.  (Here is a copy of the petition.)  The defendants’ petition challenged an order issued by the MDL trial holding that the waivers applied more broadly, encompassing all future MDL cases, even (seemingly) those that had not even been filed yet.  (Here is the trial court’s opinion.)

Since our first post, the plaintiffs’ filed an opposition brief, and the defendants have since filed a reply brief.

Plaintiffs’ response brief is confusing at times. It argues (at 19) that MDL courts can exercise the personal jurisdiction necessary to conduct bellwether trials with the consent of the parties. Well, yes. With the consent of the parties. But the existence of consent is the very issue being considered by the Fifth Circuit. Plaintiffs’ response also argues (at 18) that an MDL court’s “direct-file order”—an order that allows plaintiffs to file complaints directly in the MDL court even if the underlying claims have no connection to the state in which the MDL court sits—allows it to exercise personal jurisdiction over those directly-filed cases and to conduct trials. No it doesn’t. Courts can’t create personal jurisdiction that otherwise did not exist simply by issuing an administrative filing order. On “waiver,” at one point plaintiffs’ opposition states (at 5) that defendants had previously explained that their waiver for the second bellwether trial was “in order to allow the court to select the next round of bellwether cases.” Plaintiffs then just let that phrase lie there out in the open, essentially making defendants’ argument for them.

Defendant’s reply brief misses none of this, addressing all these seeming missteps. It also turns some of plaintiffs’ arguments in defendants’ favor. For instance, plaintiffs argue that only two cases address the states’ contacts that should be considered in a direct-file case, claiming that both cases were decided wrongly. Defendants highlight (at 1), however, that this is the precise type of lack of guidance that requires the Fifth Circuit to weigh in. Defendants’ reply brief (at 2) explains that such guidance would assist not only in the upcoming Pinnacle Hip Implant bellwether trials, but also in future Pinnacle bellwether trials and other future MDL proceedings in the Fifth Circuit, as well as dispose of a current Pinnacle appeal. Most important, defendants’ reply brief highlights (at 6) the strict standard for finding a waiver of personal jurisdiction: “a clear and unambiguous showing of a deliberate relinquishment of a known right.” Armstrong v. LaSalle Bank Nat. Assoc., 552 F.3d 613, 615 (7th Cir. 2009). Under this standard, it’s hard to see how the waivers by defendants could ever be reasonably interpreted to apply broadly to all MDL cases.

The Fifth Circuit will test and probe all of these issues and arguments later this morning. It will likely be a fascinating back-and-forth. Now, as with any writ of mandamus, this is a long shot. But personal jurisdiction is a hot button issue right now. And the Fifth Circuit’s decision could affect many cases, as this MDL trial court has a penchant for arranging incredibly large multi-plaintiff bellwether trials. Regardless, one thing that we are reasonably sure of is that the Fifth Circuit will rule quickly. The next bellwether trial is only a couple of weeks away. And so we expect to be posting on the Fifth Circuit’s decision soon.

Posts on personal jurisdiction, or the lack of it, have been all over this blog ever since the Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court. Something similar happened three years ago after the Supreme Court decided Daimler AG v. Bauman. Together, these two decisions establish that federal courts are not empowered to find a reason to assert personal jurisdiction simply because the defendant is a large company doing business nationally. General jurisdiction requires the state in which the federal court sits to be the defendant’s “home,” meaning that it was incorporated there or has its principle place of business there. Specific jurisdiction requires that the very transaction from which the plaintiff’s claims arose involve the state in which the federal court sits. Otherwise, the court should dismiss the case. These decisions hold the promise of virtually eliminating litigation tourism.

But the plaintiffs in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL are trying to resurrect it, if only in their own litigation. The MDL is pending in federal court in Dallas. And yet the MDL court recently held, seemingly, that it can exert personal jurisdiction against the defendants and conduct trials in every case before it, even those that have no connection to Texas.

As many of us know, MDL courts have jurisdiction over the many cases that are transferred to them, but only for pretrial purposes. The transfer does not create personal jurisdiction for trial. Cases over which the MDL court does not have such personal jurisdiction must be transferred for trial back to the originating district court—or an appropriate district court that can exert personal jurisdiction. 28 U.S.C. 1407(a).

So, how is the MDL court doing this? Well, the lack of personal jurisdiction defense is waivable. And that’s where the MDL court is hanging its robe. It ruled in its June 28, 2017 decision that the defendants waived their defense of lack of personal jurisdiction—and not just for cases already tried, but (seemingly) for every Pinnacle hip implant case that has been filed and will be filed and that makes its way to the MDL. The defendants made this perpetual waiver, according to the MDL court, during proceedings before the special master, who at the time was working to arrange the first and second bellwether trials.

The defendants vehemently disagree. They say that their waiver, given the setting and the very language that they used, was limited only to personal jurisdiction as to the cases involved in the first and second bellwether trials, not all cases and forever. They believe this so strongly that they have filed a petition for a writ of mandamus to the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, asking that court to order that the MDL Judge cannot exercise personal jurisdiction in any of the eight cases with New York plaintiffs that the MDL court scheduled for the next bellwether trial, which starts in September.

It’s a petition for a writ of mandamus, so from the start defendants’ chances of victory are slim. But, last year, even in losing a petition for a writ of mandamus on another issue, the defendants got one of the Circuit Court judges (in a concurring opinion) to say that the MDL judge got it wrong. We’ll see what happens here. Plaintiffs must respond by the 14th. And the Fifth Circuit will almost certainly rule before September 5, when this next multi-plaintiff bellwether trial is set to begin.

The Pinnacle hip implant litigation is never without intrigue.

This post comes from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

Plaintiffs and defendants have now completed briefing before the Fifth Circuit on defendants’ appeal of the $498 million verdict in the second bellwether trial of the Pinnacle hip implant MDL. Obviously, there is a lot riding on this appeal. In March, we laid out for you the manner in which defendants’ opening brief addressed certain key issues. Below, we discuss the defendants’ responses, in their reply brief, to the arguments that plaintiffs make on those key issues in their opening brief:

Design Defect Verdict: While defendants have offered a number of reasons to overturn the verdict on design defect, the survival of that portion of the verdict could very well turn on whether plaintiffs can convince the Fifth Circuit that an allegedly safer alternative design for DePuy’s metal-on-metal hip implant, a necessary element of a design defect claim, can be an entirely different product—a metal-on-polyethylene hip implant—one that is already marketed by DePuy. In our experience, an entirely different product cannot serve as an alternative design. Here is a portion of defendants’ discussion of this failing in their reply brief:

To prevail on their design-defect claims, plaintiffs were required to prove that a safer alternative design existed for the Pinnacle Ultamet. Caterpillar, Inc. v. Shears, 911 S.W.2d 379, 384 (Tex. 1995). Yet plaintiffs do not argue that the Ultamet should have been shaped differently, secured differently, made of a different metal alloy, or altered in some other way. Instead, plaintiffs argue that the safer alternative design is the Pinnacle AltrX, an existing metal-on-polyethylene hip implant. The question here is whether that metal-on-polyethylene hip implant—which already exists and, indeed, is manufactured and sold by DePuy—is an “alternative design” for the Pinnacle Ultamet, or is instead an “entirely different product.” Brockert v. Wyeth Pharm., Inc., 287 S.W.3d 760, 770 (Tex. App.—Houston [14th Dist.] 2009).

Brockert provides the answer. In Brockert, the plaintiff argued that an “alternative design” for a drug combining estrogen with progestin was a drug containing only estrogen. Id. at 769. There, like here, that proposed alternative already existed and, again like here, was manufactured by the defendant. Id. The Fourteenth Court of Appeals held that plaintiff’s claim failed because she did not show how the defendant’s drug “could have been modified or improved”; she instead argued that the drug should be an entirely different product—i.e., the one defendants already made. Id. at 770-71. . . .

Plaintiffs attempt to distinguish Brockert and Caterpillar by noting that the proposed alternatives in those cases “impaired the product’s utility.” But that is no distinction at all: plaintiffs’ proposed alternative design here would impair the Ultamet’s utility by eliminating precisely the feature that makes it distinctive and an arguable improvement over pre-existing products. Plaintiffs do not deny that metal is more durable than plastic, making metal-on-metal implants a more “attractive option for the younger, high-demand patient who was wearing out their plastic previously.” Nor do they dispute that metal-on-metal implants eliminate plastic debris. Texas law requires plaintiffs to propose an alternative design that replicates those benefits, not just any two benefits they can conjure up. In short, plaintiffs were required to propose a safer alternative design for a metal-on-metal hip implant, but they instead pointed to a different product altogether, which is precisely what Texas courts have held that plaintiffs may not do.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 3-6.)

Failure to Warn (Marketing Defect) Verdict: In their opening brief, defendants argued that their Instructions for Use sufficiently warned about the risks that form the basis of plaintiffs’ claims, while plaintiffs’ opening brief argues that those warnings needed to be more specific. While we believe that defendants have the better of that argument, they appear to have even stronger arguments as to plaintiffs’ failures to offer expert testimony on causation or prescriber testimony on how a different warning would have changed their decisions to use the Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip implant. Here are key excerpts from defendants’ reply brief on these issues:

[Lack of Expert Opinion]

Regardless, plaintiffs can prevail under Texas law only if they established with expert testimony that the warnings were inadequate, and they did not do so here. Plaintiffs do not dispute this requirement, instead contending that Dr. Matthew Morrey’s testimony satisfied their burden. But Dr. Morrey was never tendered or admitted as a warnings expert at trial. Plaintiffs attempt to dance around that problem by stating that they designated Dr. Morrey as a warnings expert before trial, but the district court never evaluated his qualifications to be a warnings expert or admitted him as a warnings expert, and his testimony therefore cannot carry plaintiffs’ burden.

[Lack of Prescriber Testimony]

Greer: Greer’s surgeon, Dr. Goletz, did not testify at trial. . . .

Peterson: Peterson’s surgeon, Dr. Schoch, also did not testify at trial. . . .

Christopher: Plaintiffs do not dispute that Christopher’s surgeon, Dr. Kearns, “never read an [IFU] on the Pinnacle Ultamet” and did not know what the IFU said “regarding risks for the implantation of these devices.” . . .

Klusmann: Plaintiffs assert that Klusmann’s surgeon, Dr. Heinrich, testified that additional information “would have changed how he treated Klusmann.” But Heinrich did not say he would have used a different hip implant; he said only that he would have evaluated Klusmann’s post-implant symptoms differently. Dr. Heinrich never testified that he would have used anything other than the Ultamet, and in fact testified that he was aware of the risk of metal ions attacking tissue, but used the Ultamet anyway.

Aoki: The only testimony plaintiffs cite about Aoki is her statement that Dr. Heinrich told her the Ultamet could last “up to 20 years and perhaps life.” But that testimony does not prove that Dr. Heinrich would have used a different implant if DePuy provided different warnings, especially in light of his testimony that he was aware of the Ultamet’s risks. . . . .

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 10-14.)

Verdict against J&J: Defendants’ reply brief surgically attacks plaintiffs’ arguments on why the trial court could maintain personal jurisdiction over DePuy’s parent company, J&J, as well as plaintiffs’ theories for ultimately holding J&J liable. Plaintiffs’ personal jurisdiction arguments appear to be different from those raised at trial (and therefore waived) and to rely on exhibits that, in some cases, were not even admitted at trial and acts that were not committed by J&J itself, but instead by its subsidiaries. Plaintiffs’ opening brief also struggles to support the viability of their substantive claims against J&J, including how plaintiffs can turn an affirmative defense for a non-manufacturing seller into a cause of action. Here is how defendants sum up these problems in the introduction to their reply brief:

Plaintiffs’ efforts to justify J&J’s presence in this case are no more persuasive. They abandon their previous personal-jurisdiction arguments for new ones, asking this Court to adopt a stream-of-commerce theory so expansive it would bring every parent company into any litigation involving a subsidiary. They try to buttress that argument with lengthy footnotes full of string-cites to evidence either not in the trial record or not what they claim, but super-sized footnotes are no substitute for minimum contacts, which are plainly lacking. And even if they could establish jurisdiction, plaintiffs have no viable claims against J&J. They do not point to a single Texas case holding a defendant liable in tort for a “nonmanufacturing seller” claim or an aiding-and-abetting claim, and they fail to show that J&J undertook a duty for their protection or that they relied on its performance.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 1.)

Highly Inflammatory, Irrelevant and Unduly Prejudicial Evidence: This is the BIG issue, the one that raised so many eyebrows as the trial moved on. In their opening brief, plaintiffs try to calm those reactions by underplaying their use of this evidence at trial and its importance to the verdict. But the defendants reply brief reacts effectively to this tactic, providing detail on plaintiffs’ repeated, not limited, used of this evidence, so much so that it formed a central component of their presentation to the jury. Here is how defendants address this issue in, once again, the introduction to their reply brief:

Plaintiffs’ defense of the inflammatory evidence they introduced at trial is to assert that each transgression was not that inflammatory. After all, they referenced Saddam Hussein in only “a handful of exchanges,” linked defendants to tobacco and asbestos companies while questioning only “one defense expert,” invoked the threat of cancer for only “three-and-a-half pages of testimony,” implied just “twice” that the Ultamet could lead to suicide, told the jury that plaintiffs considered jumping off a bridge for a mere “five lines of argument,” mentioned the thousands of other lawsuits in the MDL only “on five occasions,” and discussed transvaginal mesh lawsuits brought by “45,000 women” for only “12 lines of testimony.” The suggestion that the combined effect of all this profoundly prejudicial evidence was marginal does not pass the straight-face test; indeed, the best indication of the importance of this evidence is that fact that plaintiffs’ counsel repeated all of it in his closing statement to the jury. Inflaming the jury’s passions through irrelevant evidence was not just a happenstance but a core component of plaintiffs’ trial strategy, and the gargantuan verdict shows the success of that strategy.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 2.)

Next comes oral argument and then the Fifth Circuit’s decision. And that decision will, quite obviously, have a major impact on the future of an MDL that without appellate intervention appears destined to produce more and more massive verdicts.

This post comes from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

We’ve been following the Pinnacle MDL closely through the last two bellwether trials, starting with the news coming out of the second bellwether trial of particularly curious and prejudicial evidence being presented to the jury. Given that evidence, we expected a plaintiffs’ victory, an expectation that was borne out with a whopping $498 million verdict. It raised an immediate question: “What will the Fifth Circuit do?”

Well, we’re on our way to finding out. The defense recently filed their opening appellate brief. While it features the controversial evidentiary rulings, much more is in play. If you would like to take a look for yourself, here is the brief.  Below are some of the key issues, along with a quick description of the defense’s arguments:

Design Defect Claim against DePuy (Brief at 20-29): Claim that all metal-on-metal hip implants are defective is not viable under Texas law because a wholly different product cannot serve as a safer design; design claim is preempted because the FDA approved metal-on-metal hip implants; and design claim fails under Restatement (Second) of Torts 402A comment k (adopted in Texas), which recognizes that products like implantable devices are unavoidably unsafe and therefore not defective if properly made and warned about.

Continue Reading Briefing Underway in Appeal of Half-Billion-Dollar Verdict in Pinnacle MDL

Well that was something. When we left you last Thursday, the jury for the third bellwether trial in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL had just started its deliberations, and we once again expressed concern over the trial’s evidentiary and procedural rulings and the effect they might have on the verdict. Our concern-level was high. Last time, amidst similar concerns, the jury came back with a half-billion dollar verdict.

Apparently that was chump change. Everything is bigger in Texas. And this time it was over one billion. Let that sink in. Over one billion. That’s a massive amount of money. Has anyone even ever won that in a lottery? It’s 1,000 winners of Who Wants to Be A Millionaire. And then you have to add about 40 more winners because the actual verdict was about $1.04 billion.

Continue Reading The One-Billion-Dollar Verdict

This post comes from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

After two months, the third bellwether trial in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL is coming to an end. The jury heard closing arguments yesterday and began deliberating late in the afternoon. They start up again this morning.

Much like the second bellwether trial, this trial was not without controversy. The signs were ominous before it began.  Two weeks before trial, the court issued a sua sponte order consolidating six separate plaintiffs for the trial, close to any defendant’s worst nightmare. The court also ruled that plaintiffs could serve notices that would require company witnesses who were outside the geographic reach of the court to nonetheless testify live via satellite. Defendants could not substitute trial depositions for the satellite testimony, even though trial depositions had already been taken, complete with cross-examination of the witnesses by plaintiffs’ counsel. This order was sufficiently controversial that a Fifth Circuit judge, while concurring with his colleagues’ decision to reject defendants’ writ of mandamus challenging the order, chose to issue a one-sentence concurring opinion saying that the MDL judge got it wrong.

Continue Reading Buckle Up: The Jury Is Out in the Pinnacle Hip Implant MDL’s Third Bellwether Trial