Kentucky –sure, it gets pretty sticky in the summer, and the bluegrass isn’t really blue, and Wildcats fans – well, they’re a breed of their own. But give us the bourbon, the chicken, and the Derby and we’ll be singing “My Old Kentucky Home” and “Coal Miner’s Daughter” with the rest of the Kentucky natives.

DeMoss v. Eli Lilly & Co., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 19142 (W.D. Ken. Feb. 10, 2017) is a bit like the commonwealth it’s from — we like some pieces and others we could certainly do without. The case involves an anti-clotting drug which plaintiff alleges led to her husband’s fatal internal bleeding. Plaintiff asserted claims for design, manufacturing, and failure to warn defects under both strict liability and negligence; breach of implied warranties; negligent misrepresentation; and violation of the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act. Id. at *5. On the defendant’s motion to dismiss, all claims except design defect and failure to warn were dismissed without prejudice.

On strict liability, Kentucky has adopted comment k’s exception for unavoidably unsafe products such as prescription drugs and devices, but has not adopted it across the board. Rather, applicability of comment k is determined on a case-by-case basis using a risk-utility test. Id. at *6-7. So, at the pleadings stage, the court was unwilling to toss out plaintiff’s strict liability claim as a matter of law finding the inquiry too fact dependent. Id. at *8. This approach kicks a comment k analysis to the summary judgment stage.

Defendant also argued that plaintiff’s pleading of strict liability design defect was insufficient under TwIqbal. The court disagreed finding that plaintiff’s allegation that the drug carried “an unreasonably high bleeding risk without any reversal agent” and that plaintiff’s husband died as a result of that injury, was more than just regurgitating the basic elements of a design defect claim. Id. at *9. And on the issue of pleading an alternative design, the court allows a different drug to serve as the alternative design. Id. There isn’t much discussion of this and so we hope it’s something that can be more fully explored later in the case – after all, a different drug is a different drug, not an alternative design for the drug at issue. The court similarly found that plaintiff had pleaded enough for her failure to warn claim to survive. Id. at *12. In addition to alleging a failure to adequately warn about the increased risk of bleeding, plaintiff also alleged a failure to adequately test which the court found was not an independent cause of action, but was subsumed in the failure to warn claim. Id. at *15. Based on very similar reasoning, the court allowed both negligent design defect and negligent failure to warn to stand as well. Id. at *13-14.

Strict liability and negligent manufacturing defect claims, however, were both dismissed. Unlike with design defect and failure to warn, plaintiff’s manufacturing defect claims were nothing more than a recitation of the elements of the claim with no specificity or factual support. Id. at *10-11. The complaint fails to allege how the drug taken by plaintiff’s husband deviated from the defendant’s specifications or standard processes or how any such failure caused her husband’s injury. Id. at *11; *13-14 (negligent manufacturing claim dismissed).

Next the court dismissed plaintiff’s breach of implied warranty claim for lack of privity. Id. at *15-16. The same lack of privity was the downfall for plaintiff’s claim for violation of the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act (“KCPA”). Id. at *21. The KCPA, however, has a privity exception when a plaintiff alleges express representations were made. Plaintiff here tried to claim her failure to warn allegations demonstrated express representations that would allow her to fall within the exception. But those allegations did not rise to the level of being “affirmations of fact or promise” that qualify as express representations, so the claim was dismissed. Id. at *23.

On negligent misrepresentation, while plaintiff attempted to argue that she had made out the who, what, where, when and why to satisfy even the heightened pleading standards of Federal Rule 9(b), all of those allegations were about concealing or omitting facts. Under Kentucky law, a claim for negligent misrepresentation “requires an affirmative false statement; a mere omission will not do.” Id. at *20. Essentially, plaintiff wasn’t allowed to re-package her failure to warn claim as an additional negligent misrepresentation claim.

While it’s not a slam dunk (something Wildcats fans are seeing a lot of recently), it’s a much smaller complaint that advances to the next round. Not perfect, but good enough for now.

 

It took us a long time to understand how off-label promotion of prescription drugs had anything to do with the False Claims Act, and we’re still not so sure that the two are a fit. The FCA penalizes anyone who presents, or causes to be presented, to the federal government “a false or fraudulent claim for payment or approval.”  31 U.S.C. § 3729(a)(1).  Easy, right?  As we explained just last month in this quick primer on the FCA, Congress enacted the FCA after the Civil War to curb abuses in government procurement.  That part we get.  If you sell the Army 1,000 horses and send them a bill for 2,000 horses, that’s a false claim.

We’re writing about this today because the First Circuit issued an opinion last month that comes to the correct result and also illustrates how FCA claims are alleged in connection with off-label promotion—and how they fail. In Lawton v. Takeda Pharmaceuticals Co., No. 16-1382, 2016 U.S. App. LEXIS 20943 (11th Cir. Nov. 22, 2016), a patent lawyer filed a qui tam action against the manufacturer of a prescription diabetes medication.  He did not actually use the medication, nor did he buy or sell it.  So what did he allege?  He alleged that the manufacturer engaged in an elaborate scheme to promote the drug for un-approved uses—off-label promotion—and that the manufacturer thereby induced medical providers to make allegedly false claims for reimbursement to Medicare and Medicaid. Id. at **4-7.

It’s a two-step process. The manufacturer did not itself make a false claim, but rather engaged in alleged conduct that induced someone else to make a claim, whether the claimant knew it was false or not.  The problem for the plaintiff (or more accurately, the “relator”) is that he alleged neither falseness nor a claim.  We call that a double whammy.  Or maybe it’s a double fault.

Continue Reading This Is How A False Claims Act Case Works—And Fails

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

“He who knows others is wise; he who knows himself is enlightened.” — Lao Tzu

This may not be exactly what the court in Moore v. C.R. Bard, Inc., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 156923 (E.D. Tenn. Nov. 14, 2016) had in mind when it authored its recent opinion dismissing the complaint in this case, but the decision brought these ancient philosophical words to our mind. Of course, if we are talking about self-knowledge advice, we might be more partial to Ann Lander’s “Know yourself. Don’t accept your dog’s admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.” But, we trust you get the point. You better know yourself first before you start worrying about what you don’t know about others.

Plaintiffs tend to put the cart before the horse on this issue. When faced with a motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim, plaintiffs focus intently on what they claim they don’t know yet or can’t possibly know – but never seem interested in all of the things that they should know before filing a lawsuit. That’s a big part of where plaintiffs fell short in Moore.

During surgery to repair a hernia, two mesh products were implanted in plaintiff – one Bard product and one Ethicon product. Id. at *2-3. Plaintiff alleged that both products were made of polypropylene; that both defendants failed to adequately warn about the risks of their products; and that following surgery plaintiff’s condition worsened which he alleges is due to one or both of the mesh products. Id. at *3-4. And, that is all plaintiff alleged.

Continue Reading Excellent TwIqbal Decision — Plaintiffs Need to Look for Some Enlightenment

Drug and device cases regularly involve plaintiffs who have suffered serious injuries, the type that engender sympathy, even from defense attorneys. It’s understandable that a plaintiff who suffered such trauma would turn to the courts for redress. But bad experiences do not make a viable drug or device claim. Drugs and devices have inherent risks, so the law requires more than injury due to those risks for a viable products liability claim. Generally, the injury must result from a defect of some sort, such as a design, manufacturing or warning defect. If a plaintiff doesn’t allege such a defect, the court must dismiss the claim, no matter how traumatic the plaintiff’s injury.

Smith v. Pride Mobility Products Corp., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 149955 (N.D. Cal. Oct. 28, 2016), illustrates this. The plaintiff was wheelchair-bound and claimed that, while attending a Renaissance Fair, the power to her wheelchair gave out as she was trying to climb a steep hill. Ultimately, the wheelchair went into a free-wheel fall at a sharp angle down the hill, throwing plaintiff from the wheelchair to the ground. Plaintiff claimed serious injury to her neck and knee, permanent disability to one of her toes, whiplash and serious psychological and emotional distress resulting from the event and her injuries.

These allegations no doubt suggest great trauma for the plaintiff. But do they state a claim? The initial consideration for a court is not the severity of the injuries or the trauma that led to them but whether the plaintiff’s allegations are sufficient to state a viable products liability claim. Here, the Smith court did its job. It reviewed plaintiff’s allegations dispassionately and determined that plaintiff had not made the type of allegations necessary to state a manufacturing defect claim:

In order to allege a strict products liability claim under a manufacturing-defect theory, a plaintiff “must identify/explain how the [product] either deviated from [the company’s] intended result/design or how the [product] deviated from other seemingly identical” models of the product.

Here, Plaintiff states that the wheelchair started “freewheeling down [a] hill” after Plaintiff placed the wheelchair in reverse on a hill and that the wheelchair “was either defective or . . . deliberately designed to” freewheel in such a manner. The complaint does not state how the wheelchair that Plaintiff purchased is different from the design of the wheelchair that Defendant intended or from other identical models of the wheelchair. Rather, “Plaintiff[] make[s] only conclusory allegations” that the product is defective, which is insufficient to allege a manufacturing defect claim.

Id. at *25-26 (citations omitted).

Continue Reading Bad Experiences and Serious Injury Do Not Make a Drug and Device Law Claim

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

If you’re even remotely interested in the topic of preemption in Pre-Market Approved (PMA) medical devices that were used in an off-label manner, simply search this blog for our Infuse cases. There are dozens and almost all are complete victories for the defense. What occasionally survives are fraud or misrepresentation claims, although they have a tough time meeting the heightened pleading standard of Rule 9(b), or failure to warn claims where a court recognizes failure to submit adverse events to the FDA as parallel to a state law duty to warn physicians. As you’ll easily see from our prior writings, we don’t understand that parallelism at all.

The most recent Infuse victory strikes a blow at each and every attempt by plaintiffs to circumvent, dodge, sidestep, and elude preemption and pleadings standards. And with each by-pass blocked, plaintiffs’ claims had nowhere to go.

As a quick refresher, Infuse is a medical device used to stimulate bone growth in spinal fusion surgeries. It is a multi-component device that received FDA PMA approval for use in single-level, anterior, lumbar surgeries. Aaron v. Medtronic, Inc., — F. Supp.3d –, 2016 WL 5242957, *1-2 (W.D. Ohio Sep. 22, 2016). Aaron is actually a consolidation of the claims of several hundred plaintiffs who alleged they were injured by their surgeon’s use of the Infuse device in an off-label manner. Specifically, they allege the device was either implanted without all of its component parts, implanted posteriorly, implanted at multiple levels, or implanted in their cervical or thoracic spines. Id. at *2. Plaintiffs’ causes of action are fraud/misrepresentation, strict liability failure to warn, strict liability design defect, negligence, and breach of express and implied warranties. Id. Defendants moved to dismiss all claims on several grounds, including most predominantly preemption.

Before getting to the substantive analysis, the court had to consider what pleadings standard to apply. Wait. Isn’t it TwIqbal? What’s the issue? The answer is the Seventh Circuit decision in Bausch v. Stryker. The Aaron plaintiffs alleged that they did not need to plead the specific federal law or regulations that defendant allegedly violated because medical device products liability cases should have a “more permissive” review standard. Id. at *3. Plaintiffs got that idea from Bausch which held that particularity in pleading the specific FDA regulations violated was not necessary due to much of the “critical information” being kept confidential. Id. at *3-4. Many courts disagree with Bausch, including the Sixth Circuit which held in a non-medical device case that a “natural imbalance of information” does not warrant lowering Rule 8’s pleading standards. Id. at *4. The discovery process cannot be used to find sufficient factual support for plaintiffs’ pleadings after the fact. So, Aaron applies TwIqbal, not some watered down version (although the court does state that some of plaintiffs’ claims might not have withstood application of that lesser standard).

Continue Reading Another Slam Dunk Infuse Win – Preemption and More

When we think of prescription medical devices, we usually think of the sorts of devices that are implanted during surgery and tend to end up in litigation—artificial joints, pacemakers, surgical meshes, and bone cements, to name a few.  Devices according to the FDCA also include “in vitro reagent[s] . . . intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions.”  There are a whole slew of diagnostic devices that are used to test blood, tissue, or other stuff from the body to provide useful health information.  Some of them get used directly by health care professionals, some can be purchased over-the-counter, and some need a prescription for the patient to use it at home.  We know that plaintiffs sue over just about every kind of device under a range of theories, but we do not recall seeing consumer fraud claims over prescription diagnostic devices.  That is what we have in Andren v. Alere, Inc., No. 16cv1255-GPC(NLS), 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 124252 (S.D. Cal. Sept. 13, 2016), and we thought the issues were interesting enough to spend a little time sharing them with devoted readers.

Andren is a decision on a motion to dismiss a purported class action complaint brought by two plaintiffs, each of whom claimed to have suffered thrombotic events from inadequate anticoagulation as a consequence of inaccurate readings on a defendant’s test kit, which checks blood clotting times for people on anticoagulation therapy.  We have some guesses about why they did not just pursue product liability claims for personal injury and some of the hurdles that they would stumble over on the way to class certification.  None of that really mattered yet, because they tried to assert claims sounding in fraud and Fed. R. Civ. P. 9(b) requires heightened pleading for such claims.  Some background on the device is in order first.  Unlike the court, which had a discussion of what beyond the complaint it could consider—which we will omit here—we can say that the defendant recently elected to discontinue and withdraw the device that plaintiffs claim to have used, which followed the earlier recall of lots of the product made since 2008 because of issues with accuracy in certain patient populations or settings.  Plaintiffs’ allegations were not limited to the particular device they used and were predictably broad.  They alleged that the defendant and its predecessors received thousands of complaints of “malfunctions,” including some number that results with their devices differed significantly from what independent laboratories found on the same samples. Id. at **3-4.  They alleged that FDA issued warning letters about adverse event reporting and other issues after 2005 and 2006 inspections of defendant’s predecessor in 2005 and 2006—well before the device at issue was cleared or sold. Id. at **4-5.  In April 2014, the test strips portion of the test kit were recalled.  In December 2014, the monitor portion and other products in the line were recalled.  The recalls were because readings with the kits were sometimes significantly lower than they would have been if tested by laboratories. Id. at **5-6.

They way that these readings (of the International Normalized Ratio or “INR”) work is numbers that are lower than the expected range for someone on anticoagulation therapy (with the range depending on the underlying condition and other factors) should result in increased anticoagulation therapy.  Having too much anticoagulation therapy can put a patient at risk for undesired bleeding.  Each plaintiff claimed that their readings from the defendant’s test kits were incorrectly high, so they either failed to take a dose of anticoagulation on a certain day or reduced his regular dosage of anticoagulation over time—with each plaintiff apparently taking these actions without consulting health care providers. Id. at **7-9.  So, the alleged product issues here were the opposite of the reason for the recalls.  And then the plaintiffs claimed to have suffered a stroke (not specified as ischemic or hemorrhagic, but the former is about seven times more common and this one was apparently followed by transient ischemic attacks) or a transient ischemic attacks. Id. Based on the recounting of the medical allegations, then, the plaintiffs claimed the sort of injuries that were also the opposite of the risk implicit in the recall.

Continue Reading Consumer Fraud Allegations For A Prescription Medical Device Do Not Pass The Test

Inferior vena cava filters resemble what we used to call “daddy long legs.” You know what we mean:  the spider-like creatures with small centers, from which long, bent legs emanate in all directions.  That is sort of what IVC filters look like, although any resemblance ends there.  Manufactured from thin flexible metal, IVC filters can be implanted in the big vein that returns deoxygenated blood to your heart—the vena cava—to trap clots (or anything else) and prevent them from traveling to your heart and lungs, where they can cause serious mischief.  They are potentially life-saving devices.  They last came to our attention the other day when we received a robotic phone call asking us if we knew anyone with an IVC filter who might want to sue.  Ye gods.

An order granting a motion to dismiss in an IVC filter case crossed our desks this week, and its discipline and thoroughness caught our eye. The case is Dunson v. Cordis Corp., No. 16-06-03076, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 94873 (N.D. Cal. July 20, 2016).  The complaint in Dunson included the claims of six different plaintiffs whose claims appear to be unrelated, except that they have the same lawyers and were treated with similar filters made by the same manufacturer. Id. at **3-4.  They all alleged complications from filter implantation, and they alleged the full range of product liability claims.  Only the express warranty claim survived, and here is why:

Strict liability for design defect:  Guess what.  The plaintiffs sued in California, and California does not permit strict liability design defect claims in prescription medical device cases.  Plaintiffs tried to get around this by asserting in their opposition, for the first time, that some of them had their filters implanted in Arizona and Pennsylvania and that those states’ laws therefore should apply. Id. at **9-12.  This position raises so many questions:  If they were treated outside California, do they also reside outside California?  If so, why are Pennsylvania and Arizona residents suing a Florida corporation with an Ohio headquarters in California’s courts?  If they are from out of state, why did they conceal those facts and wait until opposing a motion to dismiss to admit them?  The answers are that these are forum-shopping plaintiffs who are importing their claims along with hundreds of others into California for no legitimate purpose.  Their choice-of-law argument did not work this time around.  The district court still dismissed their design defect claim, and it admonished the out-of-state plaintiffs to allege facts in their amended complaint to support their choice of law. Id. at **12-13.  The court was “skeptical.”

Continue Reading California Federal Court Dismisses Inferior Complaint

We ran across a Ninth Circuit decision last week that, while non-precedential, made interesting rulings. See Fisher v. Monster Beverage Corp., 2016 U.S. App. Lexis 12608 (9th Cir. July 8, 2016). It was a class-action filed under California’s trio of plaintiffs-lawyer-attracting statutes, the Consumer Legal Remedies Act (CLRA), the False Advertising Laws (FAL) and the Unfair Competition Law (UCL). While the court allowed portions of these class action claims to move forward under these incredibly plaintiff-friendly statutes, its ruling on off-label promotion and failure to warn claims may be helpful in drug and device product liability litigation.

The three named plaintiffs alleged that the defendant manufacturers made all sorts of misrepresentations about the safety of its products, certain Monster energy drinks. Only one named plaintiff made an off-label claim. But he couldn’t get out of the gate with it. He claimed that the defendants’ marketing of its energy drinks targeted kids. Id. at *2. He claimed to have seen this alleged marketing and to have come away believing that the Monster energy drinks were safe—yet, according to him in his lawsuit, they were not. These allegations may or may not have been true. But they didn’t matter. He failed to allege that he ever relied on this alleged off-label marketing. With no injury caused by a misrepresentation, he lacked standing: “That is not a sufficient allegation of injury-in-fact to support standing.” Id. at *3 (citing Kwikset Corp. v. Superior Court, 246 P.3d 877, 890 (Cal. 2011)). Accordingly, the Ninth Circuit upheld the trial court’s dismissal of this off-label claim with prejudice. Id. at *3, 8.

Continue Reading The Ninth Circuit Issues Helpful Decision Addressing Standing and Preemption

You’ve probably heard James Carville’s description of Pennsylvania as Pittsburgh on one end, Philadelphia on the other, and Alabama in-between.  Let’s put aside that last bit, which manages simultaneously to insult both Alabama and middle Pennsylvania, and focus on the rivalry between Pittsburgh and our fair city, Philly.  Those two municipalities are separated by a lot more than 305 miles.  Pittsburgh invented Big Steel, while we invented, you know, freedom.  People in Pittsburgh eat huge sandwiches containing French fries, while we fill ours with meat and cheese-whiz, leaving the fries on the side.  Our sports fans are more devoted – think Invincible or Silver Linings Playbook.  Lincoln Financial Field had its own Eagles jail.  (Granted, Pittsburgh’s teams, unlike ours, actually win with some frequency.  Congrats to the Penguins, we say through gritted teeth.)  A short road trip from Philly gets one to NYC, the Shore, the Poconos, or DC.  Not bad, right?  If you drive for a couple of hours out of Pittsburgh, you can be in … West Virginia.  (Oh no – time for more Mountaineer hate mail.)  Our city’s name is on some great movies – e.g., Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Story.  Philly was the setting for many essential flicks.  There’s Witness, Dressed to Kill (that great early scene is in the Philly Art Museum, though you’re supposed to think it’s the Met), Trading Places, Twelve Monkeys, The Sixth Sense, etc.  We could go on and on.  (Go ahead, dare us.)  Ever heard of Rocky?  By contrast, when has cinematic greatness touched Pittsburgh?  Wonder BoysThe Fish that Saved PittsburghGroundhog Day?  (And that last one is a stretch.)  Two of the greatest American painters, Eakins and Cassatt, lived in the Philly area.  We’ll take either one of them over Warhol.  (Yes, yes – it has been pointed out to us that Cassatt was born in Pittsburgh.  But she high-tailed it out of there at a young age.  She grew up in a nice area near Philly.  At least we think it’s nice.  We live in that area now.  Our street is named Cassatt – though named after her father, not her.)  Our music is better.  We’ll take Joan Jett over Christina Aguilera, Teddy Pendergrass over Stephen Foster, Gamble/Huff over Wiz Khalifa, and Pink over Pink Panther (i.e., Henry Mancini, composer of the theme song).  In a recent poll, the Philly accent was listed as one of America’s ugliest.  But guess who ‘won’ as ugliest of all?  Pittsburgh, the heewme of the Yinzers.

But if we had to defend a drug or device client, we’d probably rather be in Pittsburgh.  We do not remember anybody ever calling Pittsburgh a judicial heck-hole.  Jurors there seem to have a Midwestern-sort of sanity, unlike our jurors, who flip million dollar verdicts around like they were nickels.  Moreover, the judges out there seem to get it right.  They follow the rules, rather than bend them in an effort to accommodate sympathetic plaintiffs or friendly plaintiff lawyers.  Have you ever heard of Pittsburgh litigation tourism?  Neither have we.  A recent example of Western Pennsylvanian common sense arrived in the form of the decision in Carson v. Atrium Medical Corp., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 74743 (W.D. Pa June 8, 2016).  In Carson, the plaintiff had undergone a hernia repair involving a polypropylene mesh implant.  The plaintiff suffered from complications and additional surgical procedures.  Her complaint included the usual panoply of claims – strict liability, negligence, and breach of warranties. Pennsylvania law governed, and that turned out to be a bit of a problem for the plaintiff once the defendants filed a motion to dismiss.

As an initial matter, the court held that the plaintiff’s strict liability claim was barred by Pennsylvania law – specifically, the Torts Restatement Comment k on “unavoidably unsafe products.”  To be sure, while the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has invoked Comment k to shut down strict liability claims against prescription drugs, it has not yet decided whether Comment k applies to medical devices.  But state lower courts and various federal courts have reasoned that the same rationale for Comment k makes sense for devices.  The judge in Carson agreed.  The plaintiff argued that if Comment k were to be applied to devices, it should be limited to products that were “accompanied by proper directions and warning.”  Under that reasoning, a failure to warn claim would get a plaintiff out from under Comment k.    But the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has rejected that exception for prescription drugs, so there was no reason to gin it up for devices.  Maybe some other states have recognized or made up caveats to Comment k’s exclusion of strict liability claims, but the Carson court correctly felt bound by Pennsylvania law, which does not recognize such caveats.  Goodbye, strict liability.

Continue Reading W.D. Penn. Dismisses Most Claims in Hernia Mesh Case

In a rare harkening to our past and discussion of specific judges, we recall that our first gig after law school was clerking for Judge Jon P. McCalla of the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee.  Downtown Memphis had not yet undergone “gentrification,” so a short walk in any direction from the Federal Building had to be undertaken with some caution.  In addition to barbecue and blues, a federal litigant’s visit to Memphis held the prospect of appearing before any one of an interesting assemblage of district judges.  Judge Odell Horton had taken senior status after a long stint as chief judge of the district; he was a Carter appointee and exceedingly nice to everyone.  He was also the first African American federal judge in Tennessee since Reconstruction.  Judge Julia Smith Gibbons had taken over as the chief judge after starting on the federal bench at 33—a Reagan appointee—and everyone knew she would be heading up to the Sixth Circuit at some point.  Judge Jerome Turner was another Reagan appointee, who we recall mostly for taking his clerks to lunch regularly and for an untimely death a few years later.  Judge Bernice Donald assumed the bench while we were there, having been tapped to jump up from the bankruptcy court by the first President Clinton.  (The actor/Senator who was in Die Hard 2: Die Harder showed up for the swearing in ceremony.)  Judge McCalla had been appointed by the first President Bush and clerked (for Judge Bailey Brown, before he went up to the Sixth Circuit) in the same chambers some years earlier.  He had the military bearing you would expect from his pre-law background as an office in Vietnam and a well-deserved reputation for being “by the book” and “no nonsense.”  (The softer side that attorneys appearing before him missed was evident when he was with his family, including the puppy we helped train while housesitting.)

Twenty years later, we discuss Judge McCalla’s decision in Fleming v. Janssen Pharms., Inc., No. 2:15-cv-02799-JPM-dkv, 2016 WL 3180299 (W.D. Tenn. June 6, 2016), which follows the memorable Yates decision authored by Judge Gibbons, who did, indeed, head up to the Sixth Circuit.  Hence why we recounted the iudicis personae of the Western District from our relative youth. Fleming involves asserted state law claims in connection with plaintiff’s alleged kidney injuries from a branded prescription diabetes drug.  Defendants moved to dismiss on various grounds, which we will discuss in the order of importance to us.

First, of course, was the argument that plaintiff’s design defect claim was preempted as pleaded. This angle of attack is noteworthy because winning any kind of preemption for a branded prescription drug at the motion to dismiss phase is rare and because the progression from Bartlett to Yates (decided on summary judgment) to such motions being viable was something we forecast/urged. As discussed more later, plaintiff had pretty barebones design defect allegations that suggested that all drugs within this class of anti-diabetic agents was too risky and that there were “several safer alternative products”—not alternative designs for this product. Id. at *1.  In response to defendant’s argument for impossibility preemption, plaintiff contended that its claim was based on a “duty to design the drug differently before FDA approval,” which could have been characterized as “never start selling theory.” Id. at *5.  “The Sixth Circuit, however, found this type of argument to be ‘too attenuated’ and ‘speculat[ive]’ because it requires several assumptions as to FDA approval and a patient’s selections of and medical reaction to the alternative design.” Id. (quoting Yates, 808 F.3d 281, 199-300).  While a case with the same drug in the Eleventh Circuit had rejected Yates impossibility preemption while granting a motion to dismiss, the analysis in Fleming was straightforward.  “The Court finds that Plaintiffs’ design defect claims are preempted by federal law because preemption can apply to both generic and branded drugs and because it would have been impossible for Defendants to comply with both state and federal law.” Id. Like we said, this is a “by the book” judge.  Other judges taking a similar approach could provide the advantage of getting obviously preempted design defect claims out early, narrowing the scope of fact and expert discovery.

Continue Reading Dismissing Drug Design Defect Based on Preemption