This post comes from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

Plaintiffs and defendants have now completed briefing before the Fifth Circuit on defendants’ appeal of the $498 million verdict in the second bellwether trial of the Pinnacle hip implant MDL. Obviously, there is a lot riding on this appeal. In March, we laid out for you the manner in which defendants’ opening brief addressed certain key issues. Below, we discuss the defendants’ responses, in their reply brief, to the arguments that plaintiffs make on those key issues in their opening brief:

Design Defect Verdict: While defendants have offered a number of reasons to overturn the verdict on design defect, the survival of that portion of the verdict could very well turn on whether plaintiffs can convince the Fifth Circuit that an allegedly safer alternative design for DePuy’s metal-on-metal hip implant, a necessary element of a design defect claim, can be an entirely different product—a metal-on-polyethylene hip implant—one that is already marketed by DePuy. In our experience, an entirely different product cannot serve as an alternative design. Here is a portion of defendants’ discussion of this failing in their reply brief:

To prevail on their design-defect claims, plaintiffs were required to prove that a safer alternative design existed for the Pinnacle Ultamet. Caterpillar, Inc. v. Shears, 911 S.W.2d 379, 384 (Tex. 1995). Yet plaintiffs do not argue that the Ultamet should have been shaped differently, secured differently, made of a different metal alloy, or altered in some other way. Instead, plaintiffs argue that the safer alternative design is the Pinnacle AltrX, an existing metal-on-polyethylene hip implant. The question here is whether that metal-on-polyethylene hip implant—which already exists and, indeed, is manufactured and sold by DePuy—is an “alternative design” for the Pinnacle Ultamet, or is instead an “entirely different product.” Brockert v. Wyeth Pharm., Inc., 287 S.W.3d 760, 770 (Tex. App.—Houston [14th Dist.] 2009).

Brockert provides the answer. In Brockert, the plaintiff argued that an “alternative design” for a drug combining estrogen with progestin was a drug containing only estrogen. Id. at 769. There, like here, that proposed alternative already existed and, again like here, was manufactured by the defendant. Id. The Fourteenth Court of Appeals held that plaintiff’s claim failed because she did not show how the defendant’s drug “could have been modified or improved”; she instead argued that the drug should be an entirely different product—i.e., the one defendants already made. Id. at 770-71. . . .

Plaintiffs attempt to distinguish Brockert and Caterpillar by noting that the proposed alternatives in those cases “impaired the product’s utility.” But that is no distinction at all: plaintiffs’ proposed alternative design here would impair the Ultamet’s utility by eliminating precisely the feature that makes it distinctive and an arguable improvement over pre-existing products. Plaintiffs do not deny that metal is more durable than plastic, making metal-on-metal implants a more “attractive option for the younger, high-demand patient who was wearing out their plastic previously.” Nor do they dispute that metal-on-metal implants eliminate plastic debris. Texas law requires plaintiffs to propose an alternative design that replicates those benefits, not just any two benefits they can conjure up. In short, plaintiffs were required to propose a safer alternative design for a metal-on-metal hip implant, but they instead pointed to a different product altogether, which is precisely what Texas courts have held that plaintiffs may not do.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 3-6.)

Failure to Warn (Marketing Defect) Verdict: In their opening brief, defendants argued that their Instructions for Use sufficiently warned about the risks that form the basis of plaintiffs’ claims, while plaintiffs’ opening brief argues that those warnings needed to be more specific. While we believe that defendants have the better of that argument, they appear to have even stronger arguments as to plaintiffs’ failures to offer expert testimony on causation or prescriber testimony on how a different warning would have changed their decisions to use the Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip implant. Here are key excerpts from defendants’ reply brief on these issues:

[Lack of Expert Opinion]

Regardless, plaintiffs can prevail under Texas law only if they established with expert testimony that the warnings were inadequate, and they did not do so here. Plaintiffs do not dispute this requirement, instead contending that Dr. Matthew Morrey’s testimony satisfied their burden. But Dr. Morrey was never tendered or admitted as a warnings expert at trial. Plaintiffs attempt to dance around that problem by stating that they designated Dr. Morrey as a warnings expert before trial, but the district court never evaluated his qualifications to be a warnings expert or admitted him as a warnings expert, and his testimony therefore cannot carry plaintiffs’ burden.

[Lack of Prescriber Testimony]

Greer: Greer’s surgeon, Dr. Goletz, did not testify at trial. . . .

Peterson: Peterson’s surgeon, Dr. Schoch, also did not testify at trial. . . .

Christopher: Plaintiffs do not dispute that Christopher’s surgeon, Dr. Kearns, “never read an [IFU] on the Pinnacle Ultamet” and did not know what the IFU said “regarding risks for the implantation of these devices.” . . .

Klusmann: Plaintiffs assert that Klusmann’s surgeon, Dr. Heinrich, testified that additional information “would have changed how he treated Klusmann.” But Heinrich did not say he would have used a different hip implant; he said only that he would have evaluated Klusmann’s post-implant symptoms differently. Dr. Heinrich never testified that he would have used anything other than the Ultamet, and in fact testified that he was aware of the risk of metal ions attacking tissue, but used the Ultamet anyway.

Aoki: The only testimony plaintiffs cite about Aoki is her statement that Dr. Heinrich told her the Ultamet could last “up to 20 years and perhaps life.” But that testimony does not prove that Dr. Heinrich would have used a different implant if DePuy provided different warnings, especially in light of his testimony that he was aware of the Ultamet’s risks. . . . .

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 10-14.)

Verdict against J&J: Defendants’ reply brief surgically attacks plaintiffs’ arguments on why the trial court could maintain personal jurisdiction over DePuy’s parent company, J&J, as well as plaintiffs’ theories for ultimately holding J&J liable. Plaintiffs’ personal jurisdiction arguments appear to be different from those raised at trial (and therefore waived) and to rely on exhibits that, in some cases, were not even admitted at trial and acts that were not committed by J&J itself, but instead by its subsidiaries. Plaintiffs’ opening brief also struggles to support the viability of their substantive claims against J&J, including how plaintiffs can turn an affirmative defense for a non-manufacturing seller into a cause of action. Here is how defendants sum up these problems in the introduction to their reply brief:

Plaintiffs’ efforts to justify J&J’s presence in this case are no more persuasive. They abandon their previous personal-jurisdiction arguments for new ones, asking this Court to adopt a stream-of-commerce theory so expansive it would bring every parent company into any litigation involving a subsidiary. They try to buttress that argument with lengthy footnotes full of string-cites to evidence either not in the trial record or not what they claim, but super-sized footnotes are no substitute for minimum contacts, which are plainly lacking. And even if they could establish jurisdiction, plaintiffs have no viable claims against J&J. They do not point to a single Texas case holding a defendant liable in tort for a “nonmanufacturing seller” claim or an aiding-and-abetting claim, and they fail to show that J&J undertook a duty for their protection or that they relied on its performance.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 1.)

Highly Inflammatory, Irrelevant and Unduly Prejudicial Evidence: This is the BIG issue, the one that raised so many eyebrows as the trial moved on. In their opening brief, plaintiffs try to calm those reactions by underplaying their use of this evidence at trial and its importance to the verdict. But the defendants reply brief reacts effectively to this tactic, providing detail on plaintiffs’ repeated, not limited, used of this evidence, so much so that it formed a central component of their presentation to the jury. Here is how defendants address this issue in, once again, the introduction to their reply brief:

Plaintiffs’ defense of the inflammatory evidence they introduced at trial is to assert that each transgression was not that inflammatory. After all, they referenced Saddam Hussein in only “a handful of exchanges,” linked defendants to tobacco and asbestos companies while questioning only “one defense expert,” invoked the threat of cancer for only “three-and-a-half pages of testimony,” implied just “twice” that the Ultamet could lead to suicide, told the jury that plaintiffs considered jumping off a bridge for a mere “five lines of argument,” mentioned the thousands of other lawsuits in the MDL only “on five occasions,” and discussed transvaginal mesh lawsuits brought by “45,000 women” for only “12 lines of testimony.” The suggestion that the combined effect of all this profoundly prejudicial evidence was marginal does not pass the straight-face test; indeed, the best indication of the importance of this evidence is that fact that plaintiffs’ counsel repeated all of it in his closing statement to the jury. Inflaming the jury’s passions through irrelevant evidence was not just a happenstance but a core component of plaintiffs’ trial strategy, and the gargantuan verdict shows the success of that strategy.

(Defendants’ Reply Br. at 2.)

Next comes oral argument and then the Fifth Circuit’s decision. And that decision will, quite obviously, have a major impact on the future of an MDL that without appellate intervention appears destined to produce more and more massive verdicts.

Next week, we are traveling to Budapest, with a side trip to Vienna. We are visiting the Drug and Device Law Rock Climber, who is spending this semester abroad studying computer science (in Budapest) and climbing rocks (in Majorca, etc.).  Aside from the beloved visage of our only child, we are most excited about seeing the Lipizzaner stallions perform at the Spanish Riding School in Vienna.  When we were eleven years old, we read “My Dancing White Horses” by Colonel Alois Podhajsky, director of the School.  This wonderful autobiography recounts Podhajsky’s extraordinary efforts to save the Lipizzaners during World War II.  It was (and is) a compelling read, and it led us to “My Horses, My Teachers,” Podhajsky’s homage to his stunning equine mentors.  Since that time, the Lipizzaners have occupied a permanent spot atop our bucket list, and we are beyond thrilled to hold tickets to one of their performances.  Beyond that, we had to start from scratch to plan this trip.  We Googled and researched, and our takeaway was how much we didn’t know about Budapest’s history and culture.

Perhaps the plaintiff’s would-be experts in today’s case should have engaged in similar assessments of their knowledge bases. Regular readers of this blog are familiar with our ongoing rant against “experts” who aren’t, and with the cases that nonetheless ride on the “experts’’ unqualified shoulders.  In this case, the Court agreed with us.

In Hale v. Bayer Corporation, 2017 WL 1425944 (S.D. Ill. Apr. 20, 2017), the plaintiff alleged that the defendant’s product, an over-the-counter (“OTC”) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (“NSAID”) caused him to develop a permanent kidney injury known as “Minimal Change Disease” (“MCD”). He asserted the usual product liability claims sounding in strict liability and negligence, and identified three experts.  The defendant moved to exclude all three – the plaintiff’s primary care physician, the plaintiff’s treating nephrologist, and a pharmacist — under Daubert, arguing that none had rendered an opinion that was “properly founded in or based upon sufficiently reliable medical, scientific, or other specialized knowledge.” Hale, 2017 WL 1425944 at *1 (citation omitted).

Plaintiff’s Primary Care Physician

The plaintiff’s primary care physician testified that he referred all kidney patients to a nephrologist and that he had never studied whether NSAIDs may cause particular kidney injuries. Naturally, the defendants moved to exclude him because he was unqualified to offer causation opinions and because he relied on the plaintiff’s treating nephrologist’s opinions and diagnosis as the basis of his opinions.  In their response, the plaintiffs stated that they would not offer the expert to testify about causation,  but only to discuss his care and treatment of the plaintiff.  The Court agreed that the doctor would be permitted to testify about his treatment of the plaintiff but would not be permitted to offer causation opinions.

Plaintiff’s Treating Nephrologist

Next, the plaintiff offered his treating nephrologist, who diagnosed the plaintiff with NSAID-induced MCD.  The defendants argued that the nephrologist’s opinions were “insufficiently supported by medical science” and that he was “not able to definitively establish by any medical or laboratory test that the plaintiff’s consumption [of the NSAID] was the cause of his MCD.” Id. at *3.  They also argued that the nephrologist’s purported “differential diagnosis” was based on insufficient scientific data.  The plaintiffs argued that the doctor had 30 years of experience as a nephrologist, that he managed the plaintiff’s case, and that he relied on scientific literature in reaching his causation conclusion.

The court cited case law confirming that, while a properly-performed differential diagnosis can constitute a reliable methodology, such diagnosis must go “beyond the mere existence of a temporal relationship” between the plaintiff’s ingestion of the defendant’s product and the onset of his symptoms. Id. at *4.  Analyzing the doctor’s methodology, the court observed that the doctor had ruled out certain diseases that can cause MCD.  He also ruled our food poisoning and some infections.  But most MCD is idiopathic.  (Idiopathic means nobody knows what causes it.)  To rule out idiopathic MCD in the plaintiff’s case, the doctor testified that he relied on the temporal relationship and on scientific literature that had acknowledged “for the last 25 years that NSAIDs can cause renal injury or renal malfunctions.” But the data the doctor cited involved prescription-strength NSAIDs, and he testified that he did not know of studies involving lower-strength OTC NSAIDs and had never read an article linking the defendant’s specific NSAID to renal injury.  The court concluded that the doctor could not “provide any scientific and/or medical data with regard to the relationship of over-the-counter NSAIDs and kidney disease,” let alone any specific data related to the defendant’s product.  As such, the doctor’s opinions were “unreliable based on the lack of supporting medical science as required by” Fed. R. Evid. 702.  Moreover, though the doctor had general knowledge about the diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease, he lacked “expert knowledge with the specific subset of over-the-counter NSAIDs” and MCD.  And so, like the PCP, the nephrologist was permitted to testify about his care of the plaintiff but was precluded from offering causation testimony.

The Pharmacist

Finally, the plaintiff offered a pharmacist to testify, as an element of Illinois’s “consumer expectation test,” that the plaintiff’s particular kidney injury was foreseeable to the defendant and that the danger of this injury went beyond that which would be contemplated by the “ordinary patient with ordinary knowledge common to the community.” The pharmacist was qualified to offer this opinion, they argued, “based on many years of educating and working with healthcare providers and providing healthcare services to patients.” Id. at *6.  He said that he “regularly interacted with [patients] and understood their level of awareness regarding OTC . . . NSAIDs and kidney injury.” Id. at *7.

The court pointed out that the pharmacist was not a physician, had never participated in clinical trials involving any NSAID, and was not aware of any cases of MCD associated with OTC use of the defendant’s product. Though he had reviewed 203 case reports, none involved MCD, and, in any event, the court had previously rejected expert opinions based on case reports.  As the court emphasized, “Because of their limitations, case reports have been repeatedly rejected as a scientific basis for a conclusion regarding causation. Such case reports are not reliable scientific evidence of causation, because they simply describe reported phenomena without comparison to the rate at which the phenomena occur in the general population or in a defined control group. . . [T]hey do not isolate and exclude potentially alternative causes . . . and do not investigate or explain the mechanism of causation.”  Id. at *8 (citation omitted).

Finally, the court held that the pharmacist “clearly [did] not have the necessary background to offer an opinion of whether the risk and danger of [the product] outweighed its benefits.”  His entire opinion was “based on the fact that there are alternative [products] that may achieve the same relief benefit.  That is like saying that an individual could safely ride the train to work and thus have avoided a car accident, [but] . . . there is no indication of a complete risk/benefit analysis being conducted by [the pharmacist] or that [he] relied on any studies” conducting such an analysis.  Id. at *7.  (We have posted on this issue before.  You can see some of the posts here.)  The court concluded that the pharmacist had “provided no support – other than his general experience – of the opinions” he had offered. As such, the court held that the pharmacist’s opinions were “unreliable based on the lack of supporting data as required by Federal Rule of Evidence 702.” Id. at *8.

And then there were none. And with no experts, the plaintiffs could not meet their burden of proof of causation.  Moreover, while the court acknowledged that Illinois had not decided whether the consumer expectation test required expert testimony, the plaintiff had not demonstrated that the defendant’s product was unsafe, because “every expert deposed stated that they believed [the product] to be safe when used as directed.” Id. at *11.  Check and mate – summary judgment granted for defendants.

Sometimes, when we write this stuff, we have trouble keeping a straight face because the plaintiffs’ arguments so lack merit as to verge on silliness. It continues to puzzle us that these experts – and these cases – even see the light of day.  But we are grateful for the sensible judges who extinguish them.

We’ll be back in a week or so, with pictures of beautiful white stallions (and one beautiful daughter) in hand. E-mail us – we’ll send you copies.

 

If you have been following along for a while, then you have surely run across our posts making some combination of the following points:  1) design defect claims rarely make sense for a drug because changing the design in some material way will usually make it a different drug, 2) such design defect claims, if recognized by state law, will usually be preempted because FDA approval of a different drug cannot be assumed, and 3) courts really should analyze conflict preemption by first determining that there is an actual state law duty that has been asserted or supported (depending on the procedural posture).  One such post walked through why it took so long until a circuit court held that a design defect claim with a prescription drug was preempted.   That case, Yates, has been followed a number of times, including on motions to dismiss, but there are still some glitches.

The decision in Young v. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., No. 4:16-CV-00108-DMB-JMV, 2017 WL 706320 (D. Miss. Feb. 22, 2017), counts as a glitch on the preemption front even though the court dismissed (without prejudice) the design defect claim and eight of the nine other claims asserted.  The plaintiff claimed to have suffered ketoacidosis and renal failure from taking a prescription diabetes medication right around the time FDA issued a Public Health Advisory about the risk of ketoacidosis for the class of medications, SGLT-2 inhibitors, to which it belonged.  Several months later, the drug’s label was revised to include warnings about ketoacidosis and urosepsis, a blood infection stemming from a urinary tract infection.  Plaintiff claimed that the inherent design of the drug, like all SGLT-2 inhibitors, created a risk of ketoacidosis.  When plaintiff sued, she asserted a wide range of claims and defendants moved to dismiss on various grounds.  We will address only some of them.

Part of our point here is that the order can matter.  We do not have the briefs, so all we can go off of here is the opinion.  After the preliminary issue of whether common law claims are subsumed by the Mississippi Product Liability Act—the four here were—the court starts off the meat of the analysis with this:  “The defendants argue that Young’s claim for defective design must fail because Young has failed to plead a feasible design alternative and because federal law preempts the design defect claims.” Id. at *5. So, what gets analyzed first? Preemption. (Remember, federal courts are supposed to try to resolve disputes on nonconstitutional grounds if they can.) In so doing, the court has to hold out as unresolved whether Mississippi law imposes the very duties that might create the conflict leading to preemption. As the court recognized at the end of its, to us, flawed preemption analysis:

If there is no state law duty, the state law cause of action must certainly fail but there can be no conflict so as to justify preemption. Put differently, the absence of a state law duty is fatal to a claim but not under the doctrine of conflict preemption.

Id. at *8.  This logic suggests that the court needs to decide first whether there is a state law duty to do what the plaintiff urges was necessary.  Because the court never determined that there was such a duty, the whole discussion of preemption seems like a bunch of dictum to us.

Continue Reading Another Court Tackles Prescription Drug Design Defect

This post comes from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

We’ve been following the Pinnacle MDL closely through the last two bellwether trials, starting with the news coming out of the second bellwether trial of particularly curious and prejudicial evidence being presented to the jury. Given that evidence, we expected a plaintiffs’ victory, an expectation that was borne out with a whopping $498 million verdict. It raised an immediate question: “What will the Fifth Circuit do?”

Well, we’re on our way to finding out. The defense recently filed their opening appellate brief. While it features the controversial evidentiary rulings, much more is in play. If you would like to take a look for yourself, here is the brief.  Below are some of the key issues, along with a quick description of the defense’s arguments:

Design Defect Claim against DePuy (Brief at 20-29): Claim that all metal-on-metal hip implants are defective is not viable under Texas law because a wholly different product cannot serve as a safer design; design claim is preempted because the FDA approved metal-on-metal hip implants; and design claim fails under Restatement (Second) of Torts 402A comment k (adopted in Texas), which recognizes that products like implantable devices are unavoidably unsafe and therefore not defective if properly made and warned about.

Continue Reading Briefing Underway in Appeal of Half-Billion-Dollar Verdict in Pinnacle MDL

We’ve often thought that tort reform should be a major goal of those interested in preserving women’s reproductive choice. Every prescription medicine has risks, which is why the FDA requires a prescription in the first place, and prescription contraceptives are no exception. But ever since the very first birth control pills, back in the 1960s, the other side of the “v.” has consistently attacked every innovation in contraceptive technology and attempted to drive it off the market. It’s happened over and over again – with IUDs, Norplant, OrthoEvra, Yasmin, NuvaRing, Mirena, Essure. Except for the Dalkon Shield IUD forty years ago (and occasional idiosyncratic manufacturing errors), all these products were (or are being) ultimately vindicated, and the FDA continues to consider their designs to be both safe and effective. Unfortunately their users have had to pay a significant tort tax in order to continue exercising their personal choice of contraceptive method.

Niedner v. Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., ___ N.E.3d ___, 2016 WL 5106479 (Mass. App. Sept. 21, 2016), is both an example of the plaintiff’s bar’s ongoing attempt to deprive women of reproductive choice and an exemplar of how to beat such efforts. Niedner involved a time-release contraceptive patch:

The patch prevents pregnancy by transferring synthetic forms of the hormones estrogen and progestin through the skin. Unlike oral birth control pills, which must be taken at the same time each day, the patch is applied to the skin once per week for three weeks, followed by a fourth patch-free week.

Id. at *1. The decedent decided to use this product in preference to both condoms and daily birth control pills.  Id.

Risks.

It is a well-known scientific fact that any hormonal contraceptive places its user at an increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and blood clots generally. This product was no exception:

[The prescribing physician] informed [the decedent minor and her mother] of the risks associated with using the patch, including that all hormonal contraceptives come with a risk of suffering blood clots. When the prescription was filled by [the] pharmacy, the package included an insert prepared by . . . the manufacturer[], as well as a leaflet from the pharmacy, both of which set forth the risks associated with use of the patch, including the risks of stroke, heart attack, and blood clots.

Id. Unfortunately, after three months use the decedent suffered a fatal “massive bilateral pulmonary embolus.”  Id.

Continue Reading Massachusetts Rebuffs Latest Plaintiff Attack on Reproductive Choice

As the calendar turns from August to September, it is time once again to concede the strength of the Southeastern Conference.  You probably think we are referring to college football or basketball, in which teams from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas prevail with grinding monotony.  [We have a feeling that OJ’s old college squad, USC, will have an ugly time of it against Alabama in the ostensibly neutral site of Jerry World this weekend.]  But, no, we are talking about product liability law.  [For the moment, we are pretending that the Weeks innovator liability abomination in Alabama never happened.  Moreover, the Alabama legislature eventually cleaned up that mess.]  Today we are focusing on the safer alternative requirement in design defect cases.  It occurs to us that some very good cases on this issue come out of the SEC.  In the beginning of the year, we discussed a Mississippi case, Mealer v. 3M, where the court dismissed a case on the ground that an elastomeric respirator was not a safer alternative to a cheap paper respirator mask.  They were two entirely different products, fundamentally different in terms of operation, longevity, and expense.   Consumers might have all sorts of important reasons, aside from safety, to choose one over the other.

[Readers who are especially nerdy or possess especially good memories might point out that in July we bemoaned a Louisiana opinion permitting a plaintiff to suggest that other drugs could constitute a safer alternative to the drug at issue.  To our mind, different drugs, which consist of different molecules with entirely different risk-benefit profiles, are separate products and cannot be treated as a safer alternative that can shame other drugs out of existence.  Under the plaintiff’s (and, unfortunately, the Louisiana court’s) theory, jury verdicts might drive all drugs that treat, say, diabetes, out of the market except one.  And even that one would not be safe from attack.  Or, to veer away from drugs and devices, we might as well shut down Harley-Davidson, since motorcycles are less safe than other modes of motorized transportation.   Live to ride, ride to live?  Not anymore.  But don’t worry too much.  You can still sing “Born to be Wild” on your Hydra Glide.  The recent Louisiana error stands as an aberration.  As Bexis pointed out in a magnum opus blogpost that strolled down bone screw memory lane back in 2013, Louisiana has quite a lot of good safer alternative decisions.]

Today’s case, Hosford v. BRK Brands, Inc., 2016 Ala. LEXIS 91 (Ala. August 19, 2016), sees the Alabama Supreme Court apply an even stricter test in pouring out a plaintiffs’ case on the ground that the proposed safer alternative was a separate product altogether.  The facts of Hosford are grim.  A four-year-old girl died in a fire that destroyed her family’s mobile home in May 2011.  The fire began in a faulty electrical outlet in the girl’s bedroom.  Her family sued the manufacturer of the smoke alarms in their mobile home.  The theory was that the smoke alarms were defectively designed because they relied solely on ionization technology which, the plaintiffs alleged, failed to give adequate warning to allow an escape in the event of a slow smoldering fire.  There are dual sensor smoke alarms on the market that employ both ionization and photoelectric technology.  According to the plaintiffs, such alarms would have roused the family in time to save the little girl.  After the plaintiffs presented their case at trial, the defendant moved for judgment as a matter of law.  The trial court mostly granted that motion, and only one claim went to the jury.  The jury ultimately returned a verdict in favor of the defendant.

Continue Reading Alabama Supreme Court Imposes Tough Standard on Safer Alternative Design