We understand that we write a lot about federal preemption. You might even be rolling your eyes at yet another post on this most powerful of defenses, but we just can’t help ourselves.  Federal regulation runs deep in the drug and medical device world, and the possibility that federal law might preempt state-law claims is an ever-present possibility.  To be sure, there is no shortage of litigation alleging that drug and device companies have violated state law duties, so we don’t want to overstate matters.  Regardless, federal preemption remains the bright shiny object from which we cannot avert our gaze.

Federal preemption demands our attention also because it is so often misunderstood and/or misapplied. We have said at times that some judges are hostile to preemption, and that might be true for some of the obviously result-oriented opinions that we review.  It is more likely that courts confront the many branches of preemption and the spider web of cases applying preemption in its various flavors, and they just get it wrong.  God only knows that the authorities are not always clear.

This is a long lead-in to a recent case that got preemption wrong on so many levels that we’re not completely sure what to make of it. In Tryan v. Ulthera, Inc., No. 2:17-cv-02036, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 140111 (E.D. Cal. Aug. 17, 2018), the plaintiffs sued the manufacturer of a medical device that uses ultrasound to tighten skin and reduce wrinkles on the face, neck, and chest.  The FDA cleared the device for marketing through the 510(k) premarket notification process, which is different from the more rigorous premarket approval (or “PMA”) process that some other devices go through.  The plaintiffs’ beef was that the manufacturer represented that the device was “FDA approved” (as opposed to “FDA cleared”) in violation of FDA regulations. Id. at **2-4.

The case seems fairly straightforward. Plaintiffs based their claims on an alleged violation of the Food Drug & Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”) and its regulations.  Moreover, the plaintiffs did not allege any complication with their procedures, or even that the device did not work exactly as it was supposed to.  Instead, they alleged that had they known the device was not FDA approved, and that it was merely FDA cleared, they would have paid less for the therapy or considered alternative treatments. Id. at *4.

Whatever you think of those allegations and the likelihood that any consumer would draw any distinction between “FDA cleared” and “FDA approved,” these plaintiffs were suing because of a violation of the FDCA, which runs directly into implied preemption under Buckman and 28 U.S.C. § 337(a).  Whether the device was FDA “approved,” “cleared,” or whatever, without the FDCA, there would be no FDA action at all. Buckman is the Supreme Court case that held that state-law claims conflicting with the FDCA are impliedly preempted, and Section 337 mandates that only the federal government can enforce the FDCA.  Whenever a purported state-law cause of action includes as a “critical” element some sort of FDCA violation, it runs afoul of § 337(a) and is therefore impliedly preempted under Buckman. Buckman involved a 510(k) device, so device categories do not affect implied preemption.

The manufacturer therefore justifiable moved to dismiss on implied preemption, and in denying the motion, the district court got off on the wrong foot, and it got worse from there. The district court began its discussion with the express preemption clause of the Medical Device Amendments, which expressly preempts any state law requirement which is “different from or in addition to” federal requirements. Id. at *10.  This is a valid legal principle as far as it goes, but it is completely irrelevant to this case:  The defendant did not assert that federal law expressly preempted the plaintiffs’ claims.  The defendant asserted implied preemption, under which federal law preempts state law where the state law conflicts with federal law or stands as an obstacle.

You might ask what difference that would make? Well, it makes a big difference, because in its next breath, the district court invoked the questionable and often-misunderstood “parallel claim” exception to preemption.  As the “exception” goes, because the MDA’s express preemption clause preempts state-law requirements that are “different from or in addition to” federal requirements, claims based on state-law duties that “parallel” federal requirements are not preempted.

We can debate whether the “parallel claim” exception is a good idea or whether federal authorities actually support its existence. One thing, however, is certain:

There is no parallel claim exception to implied preemption.

The district court’s introduction of express preemption at the outset of its opinion was therefore no harmless error. It started the opinion down a legal path from which the opinion would never recover, as the court forced the plaintiffs’ allegations into an “exception” that does not exist.  For example, the district court noted with approval that the plaintiffs alleged that California law “incorporates and mirrors the FDCA.” Id. at *11.  In the context of implied preemption, that observation alone should have been the death knell of this case because it acknowledged in plain terms that the plaintiffs were suing to enforce the FDCA.  We know from Buckman and section 337(a) that such actions are not allowed.  The “mirroring” of California law matters only in food cases, to which a statutory exception to section 337(a) applies.  That exception does not apply to medical devices (or drugs), which we detailed here.

Unfortunately, the district court misapprehended this point again and again. It noted the “linkage” between state and federal law and cited the plaintiffs’ use of federal “regulatory and statutory violations” as the predicates for their state-law claims. Id. The court noted that California statutes adopt federal regulations as state-law standards. Id. The court observed that California law prohibits false and misleading advertising.  And why is it misleading to say a Class II medical device cleared through the premarket notification process is “FDA approved”?  Because such a statement allegedly violates federal regulations.  All paths lead back to the plaintiffs suing to enforce the FDCA, which is the epitome of implied preemption.

The district court also wrongly cited federal law in support of its opinion. It relied on Medtronic Inc. v. Lohr, 518 U.S. 470 (1996), to describe the FDA’s 510(k) process. Id. at **5-6.  The court certainly is not alone in citing Lohr on this point, but as we have explained here and here, Lohr understates and marginalizes the 510(k) process’ focus on safety and efficacy and was outdated even before it was published.  The district court also stated that “FDCA regulations appear to directly preclude preemption,” but once again the cited regulation defines the scope of the Medical Device Amendment’s express preemption provision.  That provision did not apply, nor did the defendants argue that it should. Id. at *13.

Finally, the court observed that 510(k) clearance does not preempt “state statutes of general application.” Id. at **13-14.  Of course the mere fact of 510(k) clearance does not create a blanket of preemption over “statutes of general application,” and we highly doubt the defendant argued that it did.  However, when the plaintiffs is claiming that a medical device manufacturer violation a state statute of any kind because its conduct violated the FDCA, that’s implied preemption, and that is exactly what the plaintiffs alleged here.

In the end, we have a class action alleging that “FDA approved” and “FDA cleared” are different enough to consumers that the law should require awarding damages to patients who allege no injury and for whom the device may have worked exactly as advertised. We are not so sure, nor are we sure that this order will survive an appeal.

We have made it no secret that we think the Ninth Circuit wrongly decided Stengel v. Medtronic.  That is the case where the Ninth Circuit reversed express preemption of claims involving a pre-market approved medical device by divining a “parallel” state-law duty to report adverse events to the FDA.  As we have said here and here (and other places), we are not convinced that such a duty even exists.  That is why we liked the district court’s order from last year dismissing the Complaint in Ebrahimi v. Mentor Worldwide LLC, mainly because the district court emphasized another befuddling aspect of Stengel:  How on Earth can a plaintiff plead and prove that a purported failure to report adverse events to the FDA caused him or her any injury?

The plaintiff in Ebrahimi could not allege causation last year, and despite multiple opportunities to amend, she still can’t, resulting in another order granting another motion to dismiss.  The order is Ebrahimi v. Mentor Worldwide LLC, No. 16-cv-7316 (C.D. Cal. May 25, 2018) (you can view the order here), and the pleading at issue was the Second Amended Complaint.  The plaintiff again alleged injuries resulting from treatment with silicone-gel breast implants, and as in the initial Complaint, she alleged two failure-to-warn theories:  (1) The defendant allegedly failed to report “adverse events” to the FDA, and (2) the defendant allegedly failed adequately to warn patients and doctors. Id. at 3.

But neither of those theories stated a parallel claim sufficient to avoid express preemption. The Medical Device Amendments expressly preempt any state-law requirement that is “different from or in addition to” any federal requirement related to safety or effectiveness. See 21 U.S.C. § 360k(a).  Under the much-misunderstood “parallel claim” exception, a plaintiff can sometimes plead a non-preempted state-law claim if the asserted state law duty “parallels” the federal requirement.  Theoretically, that claim would not be “different from or in addition to” federal requirements.

The alleged failure adequately to warn doctors and patient was clearly preempted. Imposing a state-law duty to warn that is different from what federal law requires runs headlong into the Medical Device Amendments’ express preemption provision.  That is Riegel v. Medtronic to a tee.

As for the alleged failure to report adverse events to the FDA, that was not an actionable “parallel claim.” As the district court observed, “To state a parallel claim under California law, Ebrahimi ‘will ultimately have to prove that if [the manufacturer] had properly reported the adverse event to the FDA as required under federal law, that information would have reached [her] doctors in time to prevent [her] injuries.’” Id. at 3 (quoting Stengel v. Medtronic, Inc., 704 F.3d 1224, 1234 (9th Cir. 2013)).

Of course, this gloss on a parallel claim assumes that a state-law claim for failure to report claim to the FDA actually exists, and we don’t think one does. But setting aside that fundamental disagreement, this district court has again correctly zeroed in on causation as essential to pleading a claim based on an alleged failure to report adverse events.  This plaintiff failed for two reasons.  First, the “adverse events” that she alleged were not “events” at all.  Plaintiff alleged “potential statistical issues” with six post-approval studies, but none of those “issues” was an “ailment or injury resulting from gel bleed.” Id. at 3-4.  Second, and we think more importantly, the plaintiff failed to allege a “causal nexus” between her injuries and the manufacturer’s alleged failure to report:

In particular, she does not allege any specific facts showing that had [the manufacturer] not “covered up” these purported adverse events, the FDA would have required [the manufacturer] to modify its labeling and marketing materials or otherwise warn patients and doctors that “significant gel bleed was a potential risk. . . .” Therefore, Ebrahimi’s failure-to-warn claim cannot escape express preemption because she has not shown that [the manufacturer’s] failure to report adverse events to the FDA resulted in her injury

Id. at 5. We have blogged on parallel claims on multiple occasions, but Ebrahimi is particularly strong on folding causation (or lack thereof) into defining which claims avoid express preemption and which do not.  This is more than TwIqbal.  This is a district court ruling that federal law preempts your claim unless you can allege specific facts showing that the violation of a “parallel” state-law duty actually caused you harm.  Other courts should do this, too.

This time around, the district court dismissed the failure-to-warn claims without leave to amend, which makes sense. The plaintiff filed a First Amended Complaint, and then a Second, and if she has not alleged a non-preempted claim by now, she never will.  The district court did grant leave to amend for the manufacturing defect claim, based on allegations that the implant suffered from “poor workmanship” and the like. Id. at 5-6.  So she gets another chance, but if all she is left with is a manufacturing defect claim in a medical device case, she does not have much.

Kudos to the attorneys at Tucker Ellis for achieving this result, and our thanks to Dustin Rawlin for sending the order our way.

Last year’s list of the Ten Worst DDL cases was remarkable because all ten decisions came from appellate courts.  Yikes.  And it is not as if the bad appellate decisions were spread around.  Two came from our home circuit, the Third.  Two came from the reliably problematic Ninth Circuit.  But the ‘winner’ was the Eleventh Circuit, with three terrible opinions.  For defense practitioners, Eleventh Circuit precedents can create something of an obstacle course. 

 

It turns out that good federal district judges in SEC country also can be frustrated with what their appellate brethren hath wrought.  Last week we were sent an interesting example of this: Rowe v. Mentor Worldwide, LLC, No. 8:17-cv-2438-T-30CPT (M.D. Fla. March 2, 2018).  In that case, the plaintiff sued for negligence, strict liability, and breach of warranty arising out of injuries allegedly caused by a silicone gel breast implant. The breast implants are class 3 devices requiring premarket approval from the FDA.  The plaintiff’s implants had ruptured.  The plaintiff asserted that the defendant failed to conduct proper studies and failed to warn about known risks.  The defendant filed a motion to dismiss.  The district court wrote a thorough and well-reasoned opinion, concluding that all of the claims save one must be dismissed.  All of the claims would have been dismissed had it not been for a pesky Eleventh Circuit case that is unsound and inconsistent with other Eleventh Circuit cases.  The district judge acknowledged being stuck, but was none too happy about it.  The Rowe court’s opinion is laid out logically, and we will do our best to track it.

 

Pleadings

 

The court addresses “a growing plague on the justice system, which has wreaked havoc in this case and numerous others: poorly drafted pleadings.” Slip op. at 4. We get an Iqbal name-check.  The Rowe court recognizes the liberalities of notice pleading, but also recognizes that “[t]here is a point, though, where a pleading becomes deficient not because it lacks sufficient allegations to provide notice of claims, but because it buries those allegations among pages of irrelevant and impertinent material.”  Id. at 5  The complaint in this case was 60 pages, with 151 pages of exhibits.  The negligence claim includes “six separate negligence theories that are confusingly interwoven among each other.”  Id. at 5.  In short, the plaintiff “threw every allegation into the Complaint to see what would stick.”  Id. at 6.  But instead of throwing out the complaint wholesale, the court examined the particular causes of action to see which ones, in fact, would stick.

 

Preemption Overview

 

For its preemption analysis, the Rowe court largely relied on the recent Eleventh Circuit decision in Godelia.  That ends up having its ups and downs.  But the general preemption analysis is straightforward enough.  The threshold questions is whether the claims are valid under Florida state law, which governs the case.  If not, those claims are gone.  If so, the next questions is whether those claims are preempted by federal law.

 

Negligence failure to warn 

 

The plaintiff does not allege that the defendant failed to give the warning required by FDA. Therefore, the plaintiff must be seeking to impose a warning requirement that is different from or in addition to federal law.  Such a claim is expressly preempted by statute. Slip op. at 9.

 

Failure to report adverse events 

 

As any even semi-faithful reader of this blog knows, we think this claim is hogwash.  It should fail both on simple causation grounds as well as preemption.  We wrote about this issue earlier this week.  Some of you might know that the Ninth Circuit is a devilishly bad place for defendants on this issue.  But the Rowe court is not in the Ninth Circuit.  Instead, it is Eleventh Circuit law that supplies the framework, and this is one area where the Eleventh Circuit is pretty good, as it sees failure to report claims under Florida law as essentially alleging a claim of fraud on the FDA, which is preempted by Buckman. Slip op. at 10.

 

Failure to comply with federal laws 

 

The claims under this category pertain to alleged breaches of federal requirements and regulations. One example mentioned in the complaint is failure to do required studies.  But Florida law imposes no such requirement. So this claim flunks the preliminary test.  Even if the claim somehow survived that test, it would be impliedly preempted.  Id. at 11.

 

Negligent misrepresentation  

 

The plaintiff offered only the most general allegations of failures to disclose the risks of the implants. The court deemed these allegations to fall far short of Fed. R. Civ. P. 9(b), which requires specificity of fraud allegations.  The plaintiff “never identifies what the misrepresentations were, when they were made, how they were made, where they were made, or who made them.”  Id. at 12. In any event, the misrepresentations seemed to involve what was and was not told to the FDA.  Accordingly, those claims are impliedly preempted under BuckmanId. at 13.

 

Negligence per se 

 

Violation of a federal statute does not establish negligence per se if there is no federal private cause of action.  No such federal private cause of action exists here.  The complaint does not state a parallel claim, and is therefore impliedly preempted. Id. at 14.

 

Manufacturing defect 

 

Everything had been gliding along so smoothly up to this point.  Now we hit a rough patch.  The plaintiff alleged deviations from requirements in the device’s PMA, departures from good manufacturing practices, and vague failures to exercise care in the manufacturing process.  The defendant argued that the plaintiff never pointed to any device-specific requirements. It supported its argument by citing WolickiGables (11th Cir. 2011).  The Rowe court agreed that the Wolicki-Gables standard would require dismissal of the complaint.  But recent Eleventh Circuit decisions in Mink and Godelia cut the other way.  “The holdings in Mink and Godelia are directly at odds with Wolicki-Gables and appear to announce a new standard the Eleventh Circuit is directing courts to apply.”  Slip op. at 16-17.  (We listed Mink as the eighth worst DDL case of 2017.  Here is the post where we explained why we think Mink stinks.)  The Rowe court felt stuck.  Under recent rulings, the plaintiff could conceivably state a claim under parallel requirement.  At the same time, the court recognized that the “negligence count is nearly eviscerated by the Court’s ruling on the other theories.”  Id. at 17.  This, just to ensure there really is some there there, the court directed the plaintiff to replead the one surviving claim in an amended complaint. 

 

(This kerfuffle over what to do about competing circuit precedents reminds us of our time clerking on the Ninth Circuit, which is so huge and spread out that, believe it or not, inconsistent holdings proliferate.  What to do?  Assume there was  no en banc decision, which is what it should take to alter circuit precedent.  Does a panel need to follow the earlier or later decisions.  Your instincts might prompt you to conclude that it is always the most recent precedent that controls.  But if the recent decision’s reversal of precedent was improper, maybe even illegitimate, because it did not go the en banc route, should it really command respect?  We wrote a bit on this issue last year, as part of our extended Fosamax mourning period, and argued that the earlier precedent should control and the later deviation deserves no respect.)

 

 

Strict liability – failure to warn 

 

The analysis here is the same as for negligent failure to warn, and so is the result: preempted. Slip op. at 18.

 

Strict liability – manufacturing defect 

 

Remarkably, the result here is different from the negligent manufacturing defect claim.  For some unknown reason, the plaintiff did not ladle any specific federal requirements into this claim. Instead, the plaintiff simply relied on good manufacturing practices.  Not good enough.  Such allegations do not pass muster under either old or new Eleventh Circuit precedent.  Id. at 18.

 

Breach of implied warranty 

 

Plaintiffs constantly toss in warranty claims as an apparent afterthought.  Or maybe it is a no-thought.  The Rowe case is controlled by Florida law, and Florida law requires privity.  That is all perfectly obvious.  Equally obvious is that breast implants are not available for purchase directly by consumers.  The plaintiff pretty much conceded absence of privity and absence of a legal basis for proceeding with this claim, by not responding to the argument.  The court dismissed the warranty claim. 

 

Final scorecard

 

All that is left is the negligent manufacturing defect claim.  That should be a hard one for the plaintiff to win.

 

It occurs to us that good district judges such as Rowe’s are not the only folks who must grit their teeth and do battle with the Eleventh Circuit’s doctrinal wanderings.  Defense DDL practitioners are in the same boat.  We can relate, inasmuch as the Third Circuit (think of Fosamax) has done us few favors lately.  So we commiserate with excellent defense lawyers such as the ones who fought for and won as complete a victory as reasonably possible in the Rowe case.  Congratulations to Dustin Rawlin, Monee Hanna, and Allison Burke of Tucker Ellis, and David Walz of Carlton Fields.

 

 

Today we have a guest post from Reed Smith‘s Elizabeth Minerd discussing a PMA preemption case dealing with unusual “parallel claim” allegations involving the conduct of clinical trials.  As always our guest posters are 100% responsible for what they write and deserve 100% of the credit (and any blame) for what follows.  Take it away Liz.

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Ever since Riegel v. Medtronic, Inc., 552 U.S. 312 (2008), in cases involving premarket-approved (“PMA”) devices, plaintiffs have taken to loading their complaints with allegations of violations of federal requirements in an attempt to escape federal preemption.  Fortunately, many courts have demonstrated a willingness to sort through these allegations and throw out those that do not fit through the oft-cited “narrow gap” between express and implied preemption described in In re Medtronic, Inc., Sprint Fidelis Leads Products Liab. Litig., 623 F.3d 1200, 1204 (8th Cir. 2010).  See the blog’s PMA preemption scorecard.  In Gravitt v. Mentor Worldwide, LLC, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 4822 (N.D. Ill. Jan. 11, 2018), the Northern District of Illinois once again did just that.

In Gravitt, the plaintiffs alleged that the wife plaintiff was implanted with a premarket-approved silicone breast implant (in the wake of the Breast Implant mass tort of the 20th century, such implants were required to obtain PMA, and are now protected by preemption). Id. at *8-9.  The plaintiffs asserted the usual claims against the defendant manufacturer: negligence, strict products liability (manufacturing and marketing), strict products liability (failure to warn), and loss of consortium. Id. at *10.

Obviously anticipating a preemption motion, the plaintiffs packed their complaint with allegations of violations of federal requirements—including novel theories attacking the defendant’s conduct of certain post-approval studies and patient follow-up required by the FDA’s PMA letter. Id. at *4-*6.  According to the plaintiffs, the defendant’s conduct was deficient because:

  1. Participant follow-up in one study supporting the PMA application was 6 years, instead of 10;
  2. Participant follow-up in the same study supporting the PMA application was less than 100%;
  3. A post-approval study did not have a sufficient number of participants;
  4. Participant follow-up in that post-approval study was not high enough; and
  5. The defendant did not provide sufficient detail about why study participants required additional surgical intervention.

Id. at *4-*6.

The court methodically addressed each of these alleged deficiencies to determine whether any fit through the “narrow gap” between express and implied preemption. Unfortunately for the plaintiffs, fortunately for the defense, none did.  Thus, defendants achieved a rare preemption win in a court bound by the notoriously bad decision, Bausch v. Stryker Corp., 630 F.3d 546 (7th Cir. 2010).

First, the court analyzed each deficiency through the lens of express preemption—i.e., asking, “did this alleged deficiency actually violate a federal requirement?”  The court found that the first three deficiencies (if true) would violate specific requirements enumerated in the PMA letter. Gravitt, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 4822, at *21-*22.  However, the court found no federal requirement addressing the last two purported deficiencies because “the [PMA] letter does not require any particular follow-up rate for that study” and the plaintiffs did not even allege “that the [PMA] letter or any other federal law required [defendant] to provide more detailed reasons for re-operation than it actually provided.” Id. at *18-*19.  Thus, items 4 and 5 were expressly preempted.

Second, the court analyzed the three remaining deficiencies through the lens of implied preemption—i.e., asking “did this alleged deficiency violate a traditional tort duty under Illinois law?”  Here, the court answered “no” for every one of the remaining purported deficiencies, rendering them impliedly preempted.  The court reasoned that there was no “well-recognized duty owed to [the plaintiffs] under state law” requiring the defendant to follow up with study participants for 6 instead of 10 years, follow-up with all study participants, or enroll a specific number of study participants. Id. at *24-*25 (quoting Bausch, 630 F.3d at 558).  More generally, there simply are no state law requirements relating in any way to the methodology of FDA-mandated post-approval studies. Gravitt, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 4822, at *25.  Further, the plaintiffs made no effort to analogize these alleged deficiencies to any traditional state law failure to warn claim. Id.  Accordingly, the court dismissed plaintiffs’ novel claims based on alleged deficiencies in post-approval studies, id., creating valuable precedent in case any other plaintiff tries this type of preemption dodge.

Apart from the alleged deficiencies in the post-approval studies, the plaintiffs also alleged that the defendant had violated manufacturing standards based on allegations that the FDA had cited the defendant for non-compliance with manufacturing standards several times. Id. at *7-*8.  While the court recognized that, under Bausch, such a claim might survive express preemption (id. at *22), the court dismissed this theory as impliedly preempted because the plaintiffs failed to tie the alleged non-compliance with manufacturing standards to any state law claim that her specific device was defectively manufactured. Id. at *26.

The court did allow one narrow Stengel-type (failure to report) claim to survive based on the plaintiffs’ allegations that the defendant was aware of a higher rate of implant ruptures than it reported to the FDA. Id. at *27-*28.  The court reasoned that, were the plaintiffs to prove that the defendant concealed the true rate of implant ruptures from the FDA in violation of federal law, then the defendant “may have breached its state law duty to warn potential customers—and their physicians—of the product’s risks.” Id. at *31.

Overall, a solid win for the defense that significantly narrowed the scope of the plaintiffs’ claims going forward.

Last month, while grappling with an aphrodisiac false-advertising case, we joked that we felt like having a cigarette after reading the court’s opinion.  Today we get our cigarette.  Or, rather, our e-cigarette.  Today’s post is about a tobacco, not a drug or device case.  We aren’t squeamish about that, not one bit.  Before we worked on drug or device cases, we spent several years litigating tobacco cases.  It was good practice.  After dealing with tobacco cases, no internal documents worry us all that much.  Tobacco litigation is the ultimate challenge for a defense lawyer.   Judges and juries treat tobacco differently – and by differently, we mean worse. Much worse.  It was a point of faith among the defense hacks that many judges found occasions to reach down to some lower shelf and retrieve a Tobacco Rules of Evidence, which permitted judges to stiff the defendant in a myriad of ways.  This crazy, result-oriented one-sidedness was not confined to the judicial branch.  Remember how Florida passed an ex post facto law removing many tobacco affirmative defenses?

Moreover, tobacco litigation was good practice on the issue of preemption.  Most tobacco cases were and are about an alleged failure to warn.  But federally mandated warnings have been on cigarette packs for over 50 years.  One of the key express preemption decisions, Cipollone v. Liggett Group, Inc., 505 U.S. 504 (1992), is about the effect of those warnings.  That case is as important as air and as clear as mud.  Lawyers and judges are still trying to figure out exactly what it held.  Does the express preemption provision for cigarette warnings blow a hole through all failure to warn theories?  Is there a distinction between failing to warn and affirmative deceit?  To  the extent they have to try to figure out the scope of preemption,  judges usually hate it.  Preemption is so powerful, so completely dispositive of plaintiff claims, that some judges regard it with the same degree of affection they harbor for the bubonic plague or the last season of Dexter.  During one sidebar in a tobacco case, the judge sputtered that preemption “boggled his mind and boiled his blood.”  No wonder, then, that his rulings on preemption were a tad sketchy.

Continue Reading Smoking Out the Scope of Preemption