We’ve always hated Conte v. Wyeth, 85 Cal. Rptr.3d 299 (Cal. App. 2008), and the whole concept of innovator liability (imposing liability on the original innovator drug manufacturer for injuries allegedly caused by a generic drug equivalent).  As amicus for PLAC, Bexis tried to strangle Conte in its cradle, as discussed here, but failed, as the California Supreme Court denied review.

Good news. Others have succeeded where Bexis failed.  The California Supreme Court has just granted an appeal in T.H. v. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., 199 Cal. Rptr.3d 768 (Cal. App. 2016), an even more extreme Conte follow-up that imposed innovator liability in perpetuity − for injuries occurring even after an innovator manufacturer had sold all rights and left the relevant market altogether.  For full discussion of T.H., see our post here.  The order, entered yesterday, states:

The applications to appear as counsel pro hac vice are granted. The petition for review is granted.  The issue to be briefed and argued is limited to the following:  May the brand name manufacturer of a pharmaceutical drug that divested all ownership interest in the drug be held liable for injuries caused years later by another manufacturer’s generic version of that drug?

It appears online here.  Fingers crossed folks, but this is the necessary first step towards eliminating Conte.