You haven’t heard of Blue Car syndrome?  Remember the last time you went car shopping. You found a particular make and model (a “blue car”) and then, like magic, you see that same “blue car” 10 times in the next week. It’s in the parking lot of your gym. It pulls up next to you in traffic. It’s even parked down the block from your house. The blue cars didn’t just suddenly appear. So what happened? It’s sometimes called the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon or frequency illusion. It occurs when something you’ve just noticed, like a new car, suddenly crops up everywhere. You really are seeing more blue cars, but not because there are more blue cars, but because you are now noticing them more.

That might not strictly speaking be true for us and pre-service removal — we’re pretty sure we’d notice whenever the issue came up – but it certainly feels like out of nowhere pre-service removal became a hot topic last month. No sooner did we update our research on the issue, then the Third Circuit makes a favorable ruling allowing pre-service removal. Just five days after that decision, the Northern District of Illinois does the same thing.

In Cheatham v. Abbott Laboratories Inc., — F. Supp. 3d –, 2018 WL 4095093 (N.D. Ill. Aug. 28, 2018), plaintiff, a citizen of Louisiana sued Abbott, a citizen of Illinois and Delaware, in state court in Illinois. Before the complaint was served on defendant, it removed the case to federal court and plaintiff promptly moved for remand arguing the forum defendant rule. Id. at *1-2. As with any pre-service removal case, the dispute turned on the interpretation of the “properly joined and served” language of 28 U.S.C. §1441(b)(2). If a “properly joined and served” defendant “is a citizen of the State in which [the] action is brought,” removal is not permitted. Id.

Defendant’s argument: Under the plain meaning of the statute, as defendant was not served at the time of removal, the forum defendant rule does not apply. Cheatham, at *3-4.

Plaintiff’s argument: Allowing pre-service removal undermines the purpose of the forum defendant rule to preserve the plaintiff’s choice of forum where there is no prejudice to an out-of-state party. Id. at *2-3.

That’s the debate: purpose v. plain meaning. And that is the split among the courts to have decided the issue. Although, as our recent update points out, plain meaning has been gaining ground in the recent circuit court decisions on the issue. The Cheatham decision does a nice job of setting out both arguments with citations to cases going both ways before ultimately concluding that “the statutory text must control. Courts must give effect to the clear meaning of statutes as written.” Id. at *5 (citations omitted).

Courts that have applied the “purpose” interpretation believe that it is necessary to look beyond the language of the statute to be “faithful to Congressional intent.” Id. at *3. Those courts seem to be particularly concerned by “snap removals” – where a defendant learns of the filing of a lawsuit from monitoring the docket and then immediately removes the case. In the age of online filing, docket monitoring is not new or uncommon. Plaintiff called it both improper and strategic gamesmanship. Id. at *2. But just because something is strategically advantageous to one side doesn’t make it improper. Nor does it make it gamesmanship in the sense that it is a dubious tactic.

When Congress completely re-wrote 28 U.S.C. §1441(b) in 2011 it left the “properly joined and served” language intact. If you want to talk about Congressional intent, the buck stops in 2011. In fact, the Cheatham court, like others applying the plain meaning of the statute, acknowledge that “Congress will rewrite the statute if it feels that removal where an in-forum defendant has not yet been served constitutes an abuse of the judicial system.” Id. at *5. Having left that provision in place, the forum defendant rule does not apply where the forum defendant has not been served at the time of removal.   Defendant learned of the action “before it became a forum defendant that was both properly joined and properly served,” id., and promptly removed it. There was no bending of the rules required. Diligence isn’t gamesmanship.

And, we actually don’t think pre-service removal is not a frequency “illusion” – it’s real and going in defendants’ favor.