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Today we bring you a terrific Daubert defense win.  But, we’ll be honest it’s long.  Really long.  Thorough, but long.  So, we’re going to hit the highlights.

The case is Davis v. McKesson Corp., 2019 WL 3532179 (D. Ariz. Aug. 2, 2019).  It is a multi-plaintiff case against manufacturers and distributors of gadolinium-based contrast

We aren’t exactly breaking news by saying experts are extremely important.  Even make or break.  That’s why everyone – on both sides – want the best.  And, in more old news, doctors are expensive.  Doctors who serve as experts in complex mass tort litigation can be really expensive.  But, based on our opening supposition, we

If preemption had a family tree, the drug and device branch would be heavy.  And, as our scorecards and cheat sheets demonstrate, there are obvious sub-branches that sprouted out of major Supreme Court decisions.  We have the Wyeth v. Levine, 555 U.S. 555 (2009) pharmaceutical branch; the Medtronic, Inc. v. Lohr, 518 U.S.

Personal jurisdiction being a key issue for us here at DDL Blog, we’ve talked a lot about the “minimum contacts” needed to establish jurisdiction over an out-of-state defendant.  Not many cases, however, analyze the two specific jurisdictional tests for minimum contacts.  That’s likely because in most cases, it doesn’t make a difference whether you use

The next line of the song goes . . . But if you try sometimes you might find, You get what you need.  We like the line.  We like the song.  We like The Stones.  Maybe the Federal Rules Advisory Committee was listening to the tune in 2015 when it decided proportionality needed to be