What follows is the second part of our extensive 50-state of cases precluding plaintiffs from proceeding with claims in the absence of admissible expert support.  Part One was last week.  In most states such rulings originated in medical malpractice and workers’ compensation actions, with the relevant principles broadening to encompass product liability and toxic torts. 

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

This blogger is just returned from Ireland where we toured castles and abbeys, drove through amazing landscapes on tiny roads with hairpin turns (can’t say enough about Connemara except that everyone should go), sang about Molly Malone and the Fields of Athenry, visited a

We have two things in common with the petitioner in Mancini v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, No 16975-13, 2019 Tax Ct. Memo LEXIS 16 (U.S. Tax Ct. Mar. 4, 2019).  First, we both will be filing our 2018 tax returns in about a month from now, unless of course Mr. Mancini is more on

Medical device sales representatives are often present in the operating room during surgical procedures, especially with procedures involving orthopedic devices.  With those kinds of devices (and others), the hospital typically contacts the sales representative in advance, and he or she is charged with delivering the device in the specified size and providing any specialized instrumentation

We’ve written about a lot of Risperdal summary judgment wins. No medical causation, no warnings causation (learned intermediaries aware of risks), no alternative design, no fraud. So, when we see an opinion that overturns a plaintiff’s verdict on the grounds of (1) impossibility preemption; (2) clear evidence preemption; and (3) no evidence of general causation,