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Not long ago, an EPL (evil plaintiff lawyer) relayed to us that, based on reading our posts, another EPL had assumed we had a particular political view.  As we laughed at the notion, we pondered the issues of assumption and incomplete information.  Much like the old quip about what happens when you assume, many assumptions

People have long been fascinated by robots.  Way before the term was coined in a 1920 play or Isaac Asimov popularized it, there were stories about machines that acted like living things.  The droids of Star Wars universe are famed for the likeability and pluck.  However, there is still the specter that some of those

There was a time when we posted frequently about attempts to impose liability for injuries allegedly caused by the use of a generic prescription drug. Much of the attention has been directed to trying to pin liability on the company that developed the drug originally, even when the plaintiff took another company’s generic version. When

There is quite a bit of discussion these days about protocols. Using good judgment in setting how often you should wash your hands, what measures should be in place for a certain type of business to operate, how often to test for infection and/or antibodies, and many other protocols seems like a no-brainer. We will

Truly unique cases are, well, unique. Most cases involve variations or combinations of cases we have seen before. Sometimes you get different results between two decisions on basically the same case with a single fact different. In February, we posted on an Eastern District of Pennsylvania decision on a motion to dismiss in a case

When times are tough, attempted humor can fall flat. Opinions often add little. Fancy prose and witty turns of phrase count for little. Facts, for those whose preconceived notions allow them to be received as such, matter. The language of statutes—potentially powerful drivers of needed stability or change—should be easy to understand even without reference

There was once a musician from Michigan who rapped that “the FCC won’t let me be.”  This was in the context of claiming that his songs were only permitted to be played over this thing called radio with edits that he apparently found unacceptable.  In Cyr v. Ford Motor Co., No. 345751, 2019 WL