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We tend not to post much on appellate statute of limitations decisions.  There are a few reasons for that.  First, they are often very fact-specific, rarely delivering holdings with clear applications to other cases.  Second, because they can be fact-specific and plaintiffs are known to plead around defenses, good decisions on motions to dismiss are

We have tried to be pretty balanced in addressing a number of decisions over the last few months relating to lawsuits brought by the euphemistically labeled “vaccine hesitant” and their brethren who advocate aggressively for entitlement to “alternative” medical treatments like anti-parasitic (veterinary) drugs.  We have been restrained in treating these lawsuits as having been

As we age, we sometimes forget how things used to be.  It is not just age-related deterioration of the synapses in our hippocampi.  (We do question why hippocampi and hippopotamuses are the preferred plural forms these days and why more anatomic structures are not named for things like seahorses.)  There is also a recency effect. 

After eschewing our blogging duties during a very long trial—followed by short deliberations and a verdict for the good guys—we are back at it.  Normally, a significant criterion in how we select a case for a post is the length of the decision—the shorter, the better for our normally busy work lives.  After trial, there

It has been a while since we saw a movie in a theater.  That is one aspect of the oft-discussed return to normality that appeals to us.  When we saw a trailer recently for The Many Saints of Newark, a prequel to old HBO mainstay The Sopranos, it piqued our interest.  It even made us