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We are careful when discussing discovery sanctions, particularly spoliation, for a simple reason.  The companies we represent that make medical products tend to have allegations about failing to produce discoverable information in the course of the litigation against them.  Indeed, there is a style of litigating against drug and device companies, and other corporate defendants,

In addition to having Green Mountains, maple syrup, lake houses, an ice cream company run by summer camp buddies, a mitten wearing Senator, and a history of low COVID rates, Vermont has a history of being a legal outlier.  Some of its positions might be considered progressive or regressive.  The legislation discussed here is a

It is starting to feel like spring.  For those with a poetic or philosophical bent, spring may bring thoughts of renewal and the cyclical rhythms of the planet, among other things.  For those interested in more practical things, perhaps the need to do a spring cleaning or plan for some plantings outside.  Clutter does have

Given the events of the last eleven months or so, we give ourselves and other legal commentators a preemptive pass for the following situation:  you read a case, you think about how you would describe it, and you see that you have described similar cases in a similar way more than once.  This could be

Critics have been known to accuse us of being too hard on product liability plaintiffs and too forgiving of defendants who develop medical products.  We all have our biases, especially after many collective decades of representing the latter group, but we do think the table is often tilted in favor of the former group.  One

Plaintiffs tend to assert a bunch of different claims.  For prescription medical device cases, setting aside preemption, our experience is that plaintiffs do best—that is, avoid summary judgment and directed verdict—with design defect (strict liability or negligence) claims.  One reason for that is that it tends not to be hard to make up some theory,

A long time ago in a law school relatively far away, we took torts as a first year law student.  Many of the cases about which we learned (or were supposed to have learned) were from even longer ago and we had no idea how much some of those old cases would inform our practice.