Happy Star Wars Day. May the Fourth be with you.

If all FDA approved medicines enjoyed the preemption protection that vaccines do, the DDL product liability litigation landscape would be leaner and less nonsensical. Flores v. Merck & Co., 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 46442 (D. Nev. March 16, 2022), shows why that is so.

Bostic v. Ethicon, Inc., 2022 WL 952129 (E.D. Pa. March 29, 2022), is a Pennsylvania mesh case raising a host of familiar issues in a motion to dismiss context. The complaint is of the typically overpleaded (14-count) variety. Dickens was not really paid by the word, but plaintiff lawyers seem to think they might

These days, you are probably expecting a vaccine post to be about Covid.  And while we are sure we are not done with litigation in that field, for today at least we thought we would harken back to a good, old-fashioned, garden variety vaccine products liability case and some tried and true preemption.

The plaintiff

For the first time in two years, we write from the confines of our office in downtown Philadelphia.  While we loved the full-time “work from home” regime, we have fondly re-embraced the near-forgotten view from our 30th-floor window, along with our Dancing Barney doll, our RBG action figure, and our solar-powered effigy of

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

A lawyer is a person who writes a 10,000-word document and calls it a “brief.”— Franz Kafka

Our profession often gets criticized for purposeful confusion via legalese, fine print, or just plain old-fashioned verbosity.  We cannot deny that the loquacious and the prolific

We have promised ourselves that we will stream this week’s “This Is Us” episode when we finish this blog post.  We love this series beyond reason, and we dread its imminent demise, notwithstanding the title’s grammatical transgression.  (We generally condition any sort of allegiance on correct use of predicate nominatives.)  We are struck, over and

Some product liability cases are so bad they won’t fly even in California.  Gall v. Smith & Nephew, Inc., ___ Cal. Rptr.3d ___, 2021 WL 5027197 (Cal. App. Oct. 29, 2021), is one of those.  Plaintiff alleged that the defendant inadequately warned about the alleged risks of a hip implant, or alternatively that the

In general, people do not like to have to repeat themselves.  It is unavoidable.  Sometimes your audience is rightfully (or wrongfully) distracted.  Sometimes you aren’t that clear.  Sometimes you lose your zoom audio connection and have to start over.  Sometimes you don’t notice your daughter’s earbuds are in and that she’s been watching a YouTube

As we age, we sometimes forget how things used to be.  It is not just age-related deterioration of the synapses in our hippocampi.  (We do question why hippocampi and hippopotamuses are the preferred plural forms these days and why more anatomic structures are not named for things like seahorses.)  There is also a recency effect. 

We find ourselves, once again, hungry for good news.  We just canceled a trip to see dear friends outside of Glacier National Park because Montana hospitals are so overfilled with anti-vax COVID patients that anyone with any medical emergency risks being turned away.  Afghanistan fell to the Taliban.  And, on a more “micro” level, we