Some states seem stronger on FDA preemption than SCOTUS was in the Wyeth v. Levine decision. For example, Michigan, New Jersey, and Texas prevent or limit the ability of plaintiffs to sue over an FDA-approved drug, including attacks on the FDA-approved label. See, e.g., Texas Civ. Prac. & Rem. Code Ann. § 82.007. Sometimes

Last week we discussed the Jacob v. Mentor Worldwide, LLC case, in which a pro se plaintiff alleged injuries from breast implants and complained that the manufacturer had inadequately warned of the risks. The claim boiled down to an attack on the FDA-approved labeling of a class III medical device, and that meant it was

Almost two months ago we posted on the magistrate’s Report and Recommendation in Drescher v. Bracco Diagnostics Inc., 2020 WL 699878 (D. Ariz. Jan. 31, 2020).  Back when our co-workers didn’t include furry, four-legged friends.  When we weren’t also re-learning high school geometry.  And when pajamas and slippers weren’t acceptable work attire.  Many things

No writer made as strong an impression on us in high school as Albert Camus. The opening of The Stranger is arresting: “Mother died today. Or maybe it was yesterday, I don’t know.” Our teacher pronounced The Plague to be an even better book, and he often quoted the bit about how we had “to

Here are a couple of things that happened recently (and no, we don’t mean a travel ban on Europe or the NBA cancelling the rest of its season).  They’re not related, but separate posts would be too short.

First, last November we warned our colleagues that it was time to start thinking of alternative grounds

Well, at least that’s true when we are blogging about defense wins.  And this week, we have another good gadolinium case.  This time from New York.

Just a quick reminder – gadolinium is a contrast agent that is injected into a patient before undergoing an MRI.  The gadolinium is intended to pass through the body,