So said the Connecticut state appellate court last week.  It’s a pretty simple equation.  Like No shoes, no shirt, no service.  No pain, no gainNo risk, no reward.  In other words, you can’t get one without the other.  In Ferrari v. Johnson & Johnson, Inc., — A.3d —, 2019 WL 2167849

A product is not defective simply because someone was harmed by it. That seems a simple enough point. Courts often acknowledge it, though sometimes in a perfunctory, mumbling fashion. What gives teeth to the mumbling is when state law requires the plaintiff to show a safer alternative product. If really pressed, many plaintiffs cannot articulate

You’ll have to excuse us a bit today.  This post is about product liability – specifically Pennsylvania product liability.  However, it is not really focused on prescription medical products.  But what can we say?  We were provoked.

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“The dark side of the Force is a pathway to many abilities some consider to be unnatural.”   

This post comes only from the Cozen O’Connor side of the blog.

The MDL court in the Testosterone Replacement Therapy (“TRT”) litigation recently entered summary judgment in favor of a non-US manufacturer that did not distribute in the US, along with its US subsidiary. The judgment ended efforts to hold those two defendants, Besins