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Happy San Jacinto Day. On April 21, 1836, Texans won the battle of San Jacinto, the last battle of the Texas revolution, in which Texas secured its independence from Mexico. In the past 185 years, Texans have never ceased showing an independent streak.

That is true for Texas product liability law. It is uncommonly sensible.

We got our second anti-Covid jab this week, so we’ll celebrate by discussing a COVID/PREP Act case. The PREP Act (PREP stands for “Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness”) declaration of immunity is limited to “covered countermeasures” obtained either through agreement with the federal government or otherwise in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of

In Knapp v. Zoetis Inc., 2021 U.S. Dist. 63783 (E.D. Va. March 31, 2021), the plaintiff alleged that administration of an equine antibiotic caused his horse, Boomer, to experience “persistent lameness” and permanent damage to the “musculature in his neck.” Boomer was not okay. His condition was far from stable.

The plaintiff claimed that

The drive from our home to the Delaware courthouse takes no more time than the drive to the Philly courthouse. But those two courthouses are worlds apart. The Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas is plaintiffs’ heaven. Most judges there think everything should go to a jury, and most jurors there think heaps of money should

Ray Charles’s musical threat of “tell your Ma, tell your Pa, gonna send you back to Arkansas” doesn’t sound so bad to us after reading Green v. Bayer Corp., 2021 WL 687024 (E.D. Ark. Feb. 22, 2021). The plaintiff alleged injuries from a permanent contraceptive device and brought claims for negligent training, negligent risk

If hard cases make bad law, big cases make really bad law. No cases are bigger than product liability multidistrict litigations. Some have populations dwarfing the towns where many of you were raised. Perhaps it is the high stakes involved, or perhaps it is the judicial obsession with settling many thousands of cases ASAP, but