We’re writing a quick-hit post today on a topic that comes up often in medical device litigation, but rarely results in a court order—what happens when the plaintiffs want an “exemplar” medical device?  How do they get one and who pays for it?

We’re not talking here about the medical device that was actually used

Have you ever left a deposition feeling confident that you obtained the testimony you hoped to receive, and it’s time to move for summary judgment?  Then (whether within the time period permitted by the relevant rule – in federal court Fed. R. Civ. P. 30(e)(1) – or otherwise) you get back a so-called “errata sheet”

Defendants in prescription medical product liability litigation are at an inherent disadvantage in discovery already.  Our clients have lots and lots of electronically stored information and old-fashioned paper documents.  Plaintiffs . . . not so much.  With our opponents having many categories of information to choose from, we think that it’s not that much to

We last reviewed the case law on predictive coding (also called “technology assisted review” (“TAR”)), about 2 ½ years ago.  Back then, we concluded:

The case law has exploded.  Where only a handful of cases existed back then [2012], now we find dozens.  Substantively, we’re happy to report that courts don’t seem to have anything

In a classic case of overreaching, plaintiffs in the In re Abilify MDL, sought sanctions against the defendant for not preserving emails dating between 2002 and 2006 – more than a decade before the start of the litigation. We have a hard time even contemplating what a duty to preserve that covered those emails would

Just two weeks ago, we largely praised an MDL court’s handling of sanctions for a plaintiff’s stonewalling in response to discovery obligations, but thought the plaintiff got off pretty light for some really egregious conduct.  Today, we report on a circuit court’s affirmance of discovery sanctions against a plaintiff counsel’s conduct for being overly aggressive

Stop us if you have heard this before. A novel or movie depicts litigation in which a large corporate defendant is sued for causing a plaintiff or plaintiffs significant injuries through a frivolous or non-beneficial product. In defending the litigation, the corporation and its unscrupulous lawyers hide important documents from the scrappy plaintiff lawyer, who,