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Those of us who took Con Law as first year law students may recall Marbury v. Madison as an early test of the Supreme Court’s place in our nascent republic.  Alliteration being a mnemonic device, some may recall that Madison was Secretary of State James Madison and the decision was written by Chief Justice John

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As insightful and modest as the Blog can be, we are not infallible.  Every once in a while, two posts get written on the same decision, sometimes because we try to make sure a new post goes up every non-holiday weekday of the year.  Because of the aforementioned modesty, however, we are hesitant to deprive

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Law school exams are usually exercises in issue spotting. Buried within the fact scenarios are various legal issues. The student earns points by identifying those issues and discussing how they should be resolved.  Sequence also matters.  It makes sense to walk through threshold issues, such as jurisdiction, first. 

Goins v. Saint Elizabeth Medical Center, Inc.

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It is a simple fact that product liability plaintiffs almost always prefer state court and product liability defendants almost always prefer federal court.  This is a major reason why removal fights, sometimes intertwined with personal jurisdiction fights, happen so often in these types of cases.  Another reason is that product liability plaintiff lawyers like to

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We scratched our heads last year when the Third Circuit misconstrued the federal PREP Act to allow a state-law negligence claim arising from an alleged COVID-related death, in direct contravention of the Act’s express preemption.  See Maglioli v. Alliance HC Holdings LLC, 16 F. 4th 393 (3d Cir. 2021).  The other shoe dropped the

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To bring suit in federal court, a plaintiff must have “Article III standing.” That is to say, the plaintiff must have a personal stake in the suit’s outcome. This is true whether a plaintiff is suing individually or as a member of a class.

Late last week, in TransUnion v. Ramirez, — S. Ct.