Procedural considerations often decide cases.  Sometimes, weighty legal issues are reached through quirky procedural routes.  When it comes to whether state tort law provides medical monitoring as a remedy for people who do not have a present compensable injury, that is a legal (and policy) issue.  We have written many times that we think foundational

We don’t like class action tolling.  We don’t think that plaintiffs should be rewarded for filing a meritless class action (or any other meritless act) with a potentially broad and lengthy exemption from the relevant statute of limitations.  We particularly don’t like cross-jurisdictional class action tolling, which makes a state’s enforcement of its own statute

We’ll be very clear – as we have before:  We don’t like most class actions.  Indeed, if given our druthers, we would abolish Rule 23, as it applies to class actions for damages, altogether.  But that’s not in the offing anytime soon.  Today, we offer a class action decision that we think both sides, us

Stop us if you have heard this before.  A group of plaintiffs bring a purported class action under a range of California consumer protection laws seeking damages related to the purchase of a medical product (or collection of somewhat related medical products) that they claimed failed to comply with FDA requirements.  The defendants raise preemption

Sometimes we write on issues for peculiar reasons.  Today, for example, a case on a certain topic caught our eye because of its catchy name:  Clark v. Perfect Bar.  So many questions arise from this concise, yet provocative tag.  Did the owner of the 100-year-old brand Clark Bar get sideways with a modern upstart

“Remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were.” – Proust

The lesson of today’s case, Racies v. Quincy Biosciences, LLC, 2020 WL 2113852 (N.D. Cal. May 4, 2020), is worth remembering. Litigation can turn on recollections, and they can be fragile. (That is undoubtedly why documents end up