One of the advantages that the FDA (and other government agencies) have over other litigants is that it gets to ignore court decisions it doesn’t like, in hopes of trying again later in what the Agency considers a more favorable forum.  Here’s how one court described the same policy by a different agency:

Understood in

The “fraud on the FDA” claim that the Supreme Court held preempted in Buckman Co. v. Plaintiffs Legal Committee, 531 U.S. 341 (2001), was actually the most extreme form of a private plaintiff second-guessing the result of an FDA process classifying a regulated product.  Plaintiffs claimed that, because of purported “fraud” in the §510(k)

Truly unique cases are, well, unique. Most cases involve variations or combinations of cases we have seen before. Sometimes you get different results between two decisions on basically the same case with a single fact different. In February, we posted on an Eastern District of Pennsylvania decision on a motion to dismiss in a case

While the focus of this blog is on product liability cases, we have had occasion to touch upon Lanham Act cases involving litigation between commercial competitors.  One reason is because Lanham Act cases provided significant early precedent for the principle that FDA exclusive enforcement powers prohibit plaintiffs from bringing what amount to private FDCA violation

If there has been one regulatory constant over the years, it has been the FDA’s persistent position that off-label promotion is bad and that companies that engage in it are acting illegally.  Since we first encountered this agency attitude as relatively young lawyers in the 1990s, we’ve thought that this position was unconstitutional under the

For most of you, it has been a long time since you thought much about criminal law. Do you remember the hypothetical about the murder victim who perished on a desert hike and it was difficult to pinpoint the criminal(s) because one person had poisoned the water in the victim’s canteen, one had replaced the