Bexis has just returned from a week’s vacation in Acadia National Park in Maine.  After being rained out for a couple of days due to a stray hurricane, he climbed four mountains in three days – the Precipice Trail up Mt. Champlain; the West Face Cadillac Mountain trail up that mountain, and the Jordan Cliffs/Deer

In Knapp v. Zoetis Inc., 2021 U.S. Dist. 63783 (E.D. Va. March 31, 2021), the plaintiff alleged that administration of an equine antibiotic caused his horse, Boomer, to experience “persistent lameness” and permanent damage to the “musculature in his neck.” Boomer was not okay. His condition was far from stable.

The plaintiff claimed that

Procedural considerations often decide cases.  Sometimes, weighty legal issues are reached through quirky procedural routes.  When it comes to whether state tort law provides medical monitoring as a remedy for people who do not have a present compensable injury, that is a legal (and policy) issue.  We have written many times that we think foundational

It’s pretty easy to find well-known references to home.  Home is where the heart is.  Home Sweet Home.  Homeward Bound. Lassie Come Home.  ET phone home.  Home is meant to strike up feelings of warmth, safety, happiness.  No wonder it’s all over our songs, movies, and television.  And, perhaps at no time more so then

We’d like the answer to that question to be – most of the time.  But that’s too much to hope for.  After all, lawsuits are brought in California.  With its plaintiff-friendly laws, indeed, California is an often sought after venue by mass tort products liability plaintiffs.  But, according to a recent California appellate court

Choice of law analyses are confounding. They involve multi-factor tests and come with histories of decisional law that rarely apply those factors consistently. When you lower the microscope on the details and struggle to find a reliable uniformity, it just isn’t there. It begins to seem as if the only real conclusion to be reached