This post is from the non-Winston & Strawn side of the blog.

As we write today, we are nine days from an event, two years in the planning, that we have mentioned in these pages before.  We are taking the Drug and Device Law Dowager Countess (nearly 88) and her slightly younger sister to see

As we write this, our firm’s “return to office” date is less than two weeks away.  We will be delighted to see, hug, and collaborate in person with colleagues we’ve missed for two long years (computer visages notwithstanding), though we confess to panic at the prospect of “real clothes.” And shoes.  It’s all a bit

As we age, we sometimes forget how things used to be.  It is not just age-related deterioration of the synapses in our hippocampi.  (We do question why hippocampi and hippopotamuses are the preferred plural forms these days and why more anatomic structures are not named for things like seahorses.)  There is also a recency effect. 

Critics have been known to accuse us of being too hard on product liability plaintiffs and too forgiving of defendants who develop medical products.  We all have our biases, especially after many collective decades of representing the latter group, but we do think the table is often tilted in favor of the former group.  One

Like many of you, we spend a large portion of our professional life litigating cases consolidated in MDLs.  MDLs serve a purpose in this “mass tort” world, but they also breed laziness and complacency among plaintiff lawyers who amass “inventories” of clients they’ve never met and about whose claims they know nothing in the hope

The issue of product recalls rears its head a lot in our medical device practice.  Or non-recalls, to be more precise.   In the unsavory world of plaintiff solicitation, we have seen, over and over again, that plaintiff firms and their “phone banks” recruit potential plaintiffs by telling them that devices that remain in their bodies

Indulge us for a moment as we recount another airline adventure. Recently, we traveled thousands of miles to an important argument. Our first flight boarded right on time, left the gate right on time, and taxied down the runway . . . partway. Then stopped. Enter the inevitable announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, we’re very sorry,