This post is from the non-Dechert side of the blog.

Our latest Zantac litigation decision is not from the Florida MDL, but rather a standalone case in Maryland − Mayor & City Council of Baltimore v. GlaxoSmithKline, LLC, 2022 WL 537004 (Md. Cir. Jan. 28, 2022).  It’s a split decision, and depending on which

The Orthopedic Bone Screw litigation would never have occurred – and Bexis might never have found his way to prescription medical product liability litigation – if not for the Kessler-era FDA’s ill-considered salami slicing of the “intended use” of that product.  In that instance, the FDA had limited its cleared “intended use” to disc spaces

Today’s case isn’t drug/device, but it’s something our defense-oriented readers should know about.  At the tail end of 2021, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court laid this rotten egg:  Commonwealth v. Monsanto Co., ___ A.3d ___, 2021 WL 6139209 (Pa. Cmwlth. Dec. 30, 2021) (“CvM”).  The Commonwealth Court is a unique Pennsylvania judicial body,

The defense response to so many plaintiff allegations amounts to: so what? What difference did the complained of conduct make? Think of medical causation. Or think of warning causation in the context of a learned intermediary. In securities cases or, closer to our DDL hearts, False Claims Act cases, the ‘so what’ arrives dressed in

We’ve already provided two “reports from the front” about how the federal government is faring in False Claims Act cases where it has moved to dismiss actions over the objections of the relators supposedly pursuing recovery in the government’s name.  Here’s a third one, about Polansky v. Executive Health Resources, Inc., ___ F.4th ___,

We find ourselves, once again, hungry for good news.  We just canceled a trip to see dear friends outside of Glacier National Park because Montana hospitals are so overfilled with anti-vax COVID patients that anyone with any medical emergency risks being turned away.  Afghanistan fell to the Taliban.  And, on a more “micro” level, we

To bring suit in federal court, a plaintiff must have “Article III standing.” That is to say, the plaintiff must have a personal stake in the suit’s outcome. This is true whether a plaintiff is suing individually or as a member of a class.

Late last week, in TransUnion v. Ramirez, — S. Ct.

The recent appellate False Claims Act (“FCA”) decision in Dan Abrams Co. LLC v. Medtronic Inc., ___ F. Appx. ___, 2021 WL 1235845 (9th Cir. April 2, 2021), has us scratching our heads.  It’s like riding a legal roller coaster.  Some parts are really high, and others are really low.

Bexis first ran across

We are careful when discussing discovery sanctions, particularly spoliation, for a simple reason.  The companies we represent that make medical products tend to have allegations about failing to produce discoverable information in the course of the litigation against them.  Indeed, there is a style of litigating against drug and device companies, and other corporate defendants,