In a pair of cases, the Maryland Court of Appeals (the state’s highest court) rumbled through more than $1 billion in verdicts in a gasoline spill case, reducing them to nothing (although one plaintiff managed a new trial on one issue unrelated to this post).  See Exxon Mobil Corp. v. Albright, ___ A.3d ___, 2013 WL 673738 (Md. Feb. 26, 2013); Exxon Mobil Corp. v. Ford, ___ A.3d ___, 2013 WL 673710 (Md. Feb. 26, 2013).  While a lot of the analysis in these opinions is devoted to property damage issues (purportedly from groundwater contamination) that we don’t see much in our drug/device sandbox, they also dealt with a couple of issues that are near and dear to our hearts – medical monitoring and fraud on the FDA.

A Tough Medical Monitoring Standard

First, we’re sorry to report, Albright (the lead opinion) did recognize a cause of action for medical monitoring by presently uninjured plaintiffs.  2013 WL
673738, at *26, 31.  That being said, we’re pleased to report that the court attached rigorous requirements to the monitoring cause of action – a “proven necessary medical costs” requirement as tough as any state we’ve seen.

What do we mean?  Well, first, medical monitoring is a “remedy”; thus plaintiffs must first prove some underlying cause of action.  Albright, 2013 WL 673738, at *26-27.  Second, medical monitoring costs must be both “necessary and reasonable.”  Id. at *27 (emphasis original).  “Necessity for medical monitoring . . . must be reasonably certain, rather than merely possible.”  Id. Third, a plaintiff must “experience[] direct and hence discrete exposure.”  Id. at *28 (emphasis original).  Fourth, the condition for which monitoring is allegedly needed must be “related specifically and tangibly to that exposure.”  Id.  Fifth and finally, the risk must be “a direct and proximate result of th[at] exposure.”  Id. (emphasis original).

The court in Albright was determined that medical monitoring not become an excuse for crappy, unsupported claims:

[W]e are wary of damages for speculative claims resting on tenuous proof of risk of disease attributable to the type of exposure. . . . [W]e believe that . . . recovery for a latent disease due to toxic exposure involves necessarily somewhat nebulous forecasts of a potential risk to develop a disease in the future. . . .  Requiring quantifiable and reliable proof, however, will assist courts in determining whether causation and significant risk are present in a plaintiff’s prima facie case.

Id. at *28 (emphasis original).  The medical monitoring standards that the court adopted are expressly intended to “inhibit[] damages awards for speculative, and thus unreliable, opinions as to a plaintiff’s potential risk of developing a future disease.”  Id. at *29.


Continue Reading Maryland Allows Medical Monitoring (Sort Of); Rejects Fraud On The FDA

Having been in this business (defending pharmaceutical product liability) for a long time now, we’ve learned that what happens to prescribing doctors often comes back to haunt our clients. Nowhere is that better illustrated than with the thankfully discredited theory of regulatory informed consent, which since we’ve already discussed it, here, we won’t go