Here are a couple of things that happened recently (and no, we don’t mean a travel ban on Europe or the NBA cancelling the rest of its season).  They’re not related, but separate posts would be too short.

First, last November we warned our colleagues that it was time to start thinking of alternative grounds

It wasn’t an opinion, or a grant of certiorari, but it may be important nonetheless.  In a concurrence in the denial of certiorari the other day, Justices Thomas and Gorsuch expounded on their view of how preemption works (or doesn’t work) in the context of a decision by a federal agency (not the FDA

We might not have even read the Supreme Court’s recent – and long and convoluted − agency deference decision, Kisor v. Wilkie, ___ S. Ct. ___, 2019 WL 2605554 (U.S. June 26, 2019), except that it tripped several of our automatic searches by citing both Riegel v. Medtronic, Inc., 552 U.S. 312 (2008),

It hasn’t happened yet, but just as the Supreme Court originally did with Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, 139 S. Ct. 1668 (U.S. 2019), the Court issued an order on June 24, asking for the Solicitor General’s views in Avco Corp. v. Sikkelee, No. 18-1140.  The Order is on SCOTUSBlog, here

Just in.  United States Supreme Court rules unanimously in Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, No. 17-290, slip op. (U.S. May 20, 2019) (“Albrecht”), that the Third Circuit got it wrong in In re Fosamax (Alendronate Sodium) Products Liability Litigation, 852 F.3d 268 (3d Cir. 2017).  However, the majority opinion,