It wasn’t an opinion, or a grant of certiorari, but it may be important nonetheless.  In a concurrence in the denial of certiorari the other day, Justices Thomas and Gorsuch expounded on their view of how preemption works (or doesn’t work) in the context of a decision by a federal agency (not the FDA

We might not have even read the Supreme Court’s recent – and long and convoluted − agency deference decision, Kisor v. Wilkie, ___ S. Ct. ___, 2019 WL 2605554 (U.S. June 26, 2019), except that it tripped several of our automatic searches by citing both Riegel v. Medtronic, Inc., 552 U.S. 312 (2008),

It hasn’t happened yet, but just as the Supreme Court originally did with Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, 139 S. Ct. 1668 (U.S. 2019), the Court issued an order on June 24, asking for the Solicitor General’s views in Avco Corp. v. Sikkelee, No. 18-1140.  The Order is on SCOTUSBlog, here

Just in.  United States Supreme Court rules unanimously in Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, No. 17-290, slip op. (U.S. May 20, 2019) (“Albrecht”), that the Third Circuit got it wrong in In re Fosamax (Alendronate Sodium) Products Liability Litigation, 852 F.3d 268 (3d Cir. 2017).  However, the majority opinion,

Bexis recently filed a personal jurisdiction amicus brief in Pennsylvania – ground zero in the battle over general jurisdiction by “consent” due to a foreign corporation’s registration to do business in the state (technically, commonwealth).  As is readily apparent from our 50-state survey on general jurisdiction by consent, most states reject such an expansive reading

Last week, in Timbs v. Indiana, ___ S. Ct. ___, 2019 WL 691578 (U.S. Feb. 20, 2019), the Court unanimously held that the Excessive Fines Clause of the U.S. Constitution’s Eighth Amendment applies to the states:

Under the Eighth Amendment, “[e]xcessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual

We’ve reviewed the transcript of the oral argument in Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, No. 17-290 (U.S.), e.g., the United States Supreme Court appeal from the horrible decision in In re Fosamax (Alendronate Sodium) Products Liability Litigation, 852 F.3d 268 (3d Cir. 2017), which we ranked as the worst case