The plaintiff in Vesoulis v. Reshape Lifesciences, 2021 WL 1909725 (E.D. Louisiana May 12, 2021), was a dentist. So if he was complaining about pain and suffering, we’d step back and take notice. (Think of the Steve Martin song from the Little Shop of Horrors musical film.) The plaintiff certainly did have something

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

This blog has repeatedly lamented the tendency of MDL courts to flout federal pleading standards when assessing the sufficiency of master complaints. All too often MDL courts disregard Rule 8(a), which—as authoritatively interpreted by the Supreme Court in Twombly and Iqbal—requires plaintiffs to

Ray Charles’s musical threat of “tell your Ma, tell your Pa, gonna send you back to Arkansas” doesn’t sound so bad to us after reading Green v. Bayer Corp., 2021 WL 687024 (E.D. Ark. Feb. 22, 2021). The plaintiff alleged injuries from a permanent contraceptive device and brought claims for negligent training, negligent risk

Could a tax case ever make for interesting reading? To our surprise, the answer is Yes. In our end-of-year excavation of older cases we missed when they first came out, we unearthed Rowitz v. Tax Commisioner of Ohio, 2019 WL 7489061 (Ohio Ct. App. Dec. 31, 2019). The plaintiffs in that case applied for

Sometimes we write on issues for peculiar reasons.  Today, for example, a case on a certain topic caught our eye because of its catchy name:  Clark v. Perfect Bar.  So many questions arise from this concise, yet provocative tag.  Did the owner of the 100-year-old brand Clark Bar get sideways with a modern upstart

Last week we discussed the Jacob v. Mentor Worldwide, LLC case, in which a pro se plaintiff alleged injuries from breast implants and complained that the manufacturer had inadequately warned of the risks. The claim boiled down to an attack on the FDA-approved labeling of a class III medical device, and that meant it was