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If we had forgotten that there continue to be abundant U.S. cases of COVID-19, then there was plenty around us to remind us.  Public mask usage seems to have increased.  We heard how the “tripledemic” of viruses had made hospital beds scarce.  We have had colleagues out of commission instead of completing our assignments.  The

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This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8(a)(2) requires that a complaint contain “a short and plain statement of the claim, showing that the pleader is entitled to relief.”  TwIqbal requires a complaint contain sufficient facts to make the claim for relief “plausible on its face.” 

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We’re happy to report on a couple of favorable decisions involving some of the COVID-19-related issues that the Blog has been covering.  We have one each on ivermectin injunctions, Shoemaker v. UPMC, ___ A.3d ___, 2022 WL 4372772 (Pa. Super. Sept. 22, 2022), and vaccine mandates, Children’s Health Defense, Inc. v. Rutgers, 2022 WL 4377515 (D.N.J. Sept. 22, 2022).

Continue Reading Two Recent COVID-19 Wins

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Last year we recounted a decision that denied a preliminary injunction to selfish New Mexicans who think that they have a right to endanger others by refusing to be vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. Specifically the court denied relief to a registered nurse who claimed that she has a right to treat

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Last term the newly empowered conservative majority on the Supreme Court demonstrated to all that precedent is not so precedential, even when it had stood for nearly fifty years.  They very nearly did it again, but just missed, targeting precedent on religious exemptions and vaccine mandates that has been around for more than twice as long.

Continue Reading Vaccine Mandates and Religion at the Supreme Court

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As we mentioned in last year’s comprehensive “Survival of the Vaxxest” blogpost on the constitutionality (for over a century) of governmental vaccine mandates, there is no appellate precedent requiring any sort of religious exemption to such mandates.  Freedom of religion does not mean freedom to infect everyone else.

While some jurisdictions allow exceptions

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Using its increasingly notorious “shadow docket,” the United States Supreme Court recently stayed operation of the COVID-19 vaccine mandate that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) had imposed on large (more than 100 employees) employers nationwide.  See National Federation of Independent Businesses v. OSHA, ___ S. Ct. ___, 2022 WL 120952

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There are two main questions that surround the issue of all-vaccinated juries in the COVID-19 era.  The first is can you seek to exclude non-vaccinated persons from the venire for cause.  The second is do you want to.  At just about every CLE program we attend these days, whether in person or electronically, where judges