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Sometimes bench-bar conferences are actually useful.  Last week we wrote a post about a district court’s application of the New York statute of limitations to shut down a product liability lawsuit.  The key holding was that the statute of limitations began to run as soon as the plaintiff experienced relevant symptoms.  There was no need

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Generally, there is no medical basis for most claims on homeopathic product labels.  But thousands if not millions of people use and find value in homeopathic products, apparently regardless of the fact that the science underpinning the products is shaky at best and possibly non-existent.  However, just because one of these pseudo-remedies doesn’t work for

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We’ve pointed out several times recently (and will be pointing out in an ACI presentation today) that cases against over the counter (OTC) drugs are on the uptick. Why?  Here’s our theory: there are lots of OTC consumers, hence lots of potential plaintiffs, and there are no pesky learned intermediaries, which means that plaintiffs can

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Bischoff v. Albertsons Co., 2023 U.S. Dist. LEXIS109367 (SDNY June 26, 2023), is another favorable preemption ruling in the current spate of class action strike suits attacking “rapid release” over-the-counter (OTC) products, here acetaminophen, that were marketed in conformity with FDA regulations.  

The plaintiff claimed that she purchased a generic form of “rapid release”

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By the time of a Fourth Amended Complaint, a plaintiff is bound to get things right, right?  Wrong.  In Greenwood v. Arthrex, Inc. et al., 2023 WL 3570436,(W.D.N.Y. May 19, 2023), the plaintiff claimed that a medical device burned her during surgery.  She filed one, two, three, four, and, ultimately, five complaints under New

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We know the real quote attributable to Bill Gates is “content is king,”  But as communications continue to become shorter and more compressed, context can get lost in the shuffle; and context as much as content, drives our knowledge and interactions.  So, when the court in Henry v. Nissin Foods (U.S.A.) Co., opined that

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Second chances, sure.  Two bites at the apple, we see it all the time.  Three strikes before you are out, fairly common.  But a fourth amended complaint to cure basic pleading deficiencies?  That seems overly generous by any standards.  Well, almost any standards because that is what plaintiff got in Greenwood v. Arthrex, Inc.