Not long ago, an EPL (evil plaintiff lawyer) relayed to us that, based on reading our posts, another EPL had assumed we had a particular political view.  As we laughed at the notion, we pondered the issues of assumption and incomplete information.  Much like the old quip about what happens when you assume, many assumptions

People have long been fascinated by robots.  Way before the term was coined in a 1920 play or Isaac Asimov popularized it, there were stories about machines that acted like living things.  The droids of Star Wars universe are famed for the likeability and pluck.  However, there is still the specter that some of those

Today we bring you the DDL blog version of the “duck test.”  The “duck test” goes like this – if it walks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.  When you see a duck swimming in a pond, you don’t normally say:  “hey, look

We had been waiting for the Utah Supreme Court’s decision in Burningham v. Wright Medical for some time.  As we pointed out in a blogpost when Burningham was first certified by the district court (Utah is one of the few courts allowing district court certification), over a year ago, “[p]ractically no court has . . 

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

It’s not a long decision – but there’s still a lot to it.  Maybe that’s because there wasn’t a lot to plaintiff’s complaint. Regardless, Sharp v. St. Jude Medical, S.C., Inc., 2019 WL 3821895 (N.D.GA Aug. 14, 2019) makes some key defense rulings.