Given the events of the last eleven months or so, we give ourselves and other legal commentators a preemptive pass for the following situation:  you read a case, you think about how you would describe it, and you see that you have described similar cases in a similar way more than once.  This could be

Albert Einstein supposedly said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”  He may not have, but the point is well taken.  We often think the same thing – particularly about plaintiffs that sue manufacturers of FDA premarket-approved (“PMA”) medical devices with vague, boilerplate complaints.  Haven’t they heard about

Plaintiffs tend to assert a bunch of different claims.  For prescription medical device cases, setting aside preemption, our experience is that plaintiffs do best—that is, avoid summary judgment and directed verdict—with design defect (strict liability or negligence) claims.  One reason for that is that it tends not to be hard to make up some theory,

Most of the controversy in the recent decision, Hill v. Bayer Corp., 2020 WL 5367334 (E.D. Mich. Sept. 8, 2020), revolved around whether the plaintiff could assert a cause of action for failure to report adverse product events to the FDA.  Like the great majority of decisions (particularly since Conklin v. Medtronic, Inc.,

Not long ago, an EPL (evil plaintiff lawyer) relayed to us that, based on reading our posts, another EPL had assumed we had a particular political view.  As we laughed at the notion, we pondered the issues of assumption and incomplete information.  Much like the old quip about what happens when you assume, many assumptions

People have long been fascinated by robots.  Way before the term was coined in a 1920 play or Isaac Asimov popularized it, there were stories about machines that acted like living things.  The droids of Star Wars universe are famed for the likeability and pluck.  However, there is still the specter that some of those

Today we bring you the DDL blog version of the “duck test.”  The “duck test” goes like this – if it walks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.  When you see a duck swimming in a pond, you don’t normally say:  “hey, look