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Today we report on Farson v. Coopersurgical, Inc., 2023 WL 5002818 (N.D. Ohio 2023), a product-liability decision that dismissed all claims against all defendants based on lack of personal jurisdiction, preemption, and Twombly.

Claiming that she was injured when an implantable medical device migrated in her body, the plaintiff brought suit in Ohio

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If we have said it once, we have said it a hundred times:  medical product manufacturers are not insurers of their products.  Almost as frequently uttered would be that strict liability is not the same thing as absolute liability.  In the show position might be that the temporal relationship between a new medical condition and

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At least try to do something different.

As we discussed before, because his prescription drug warning claims collided with federal preemption, the plaintiff in Roshkovan v. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., 2022 WL 3012519 (C.D. Cal. Jun. 22, 2022), needed to plead what the FDA didn’t know, not what it did, to avoid dismissal.  His second try wasn’t any better than the first.Continue Reading When at First You Don’t Succeed…

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When last we spoke, we were about to deliver our beautiful standard poodle puppy, Luca (registered name Tivin Dreamcatcher), to his show handler, who would trim him and train him and launch his dog show career.  The transfer was accomplished without incident, if you don’t count mommy’s predicable reaction to the separation.  It also included

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Second chances, sure.  Two bites at the apple, we see it all the time.  Three strikes before you are out, fairly common.  But a fourth amended complaint to cure basic pleading deficiencies?  That seems overly generous by any standards.  Well, almost any standards because that is what plaintiff got in Greenwood v. Arthrex, Inc.

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We have made no secret of our long-held views that “failure to withdraw” or “stop selling” theories of liability for FDA-authorized medical products are unwarranted perversions of state design defect law and preempted anyway.  When we say long-held, we mean it, because we had a few of the first cases where this theory was put