Every now and then, the Reed Smith powers that be make seats in the firm’s skybox at the Phillies’ (first place – who woulda thunk?) stadium available to folks like us.  As a result we attended back-to-back concerts by the Eagles and Billy Joel last weekend.  Yes, we know that dates us – that was

When we first looked at the decision for today’s post, we thought about comparing it to fan fiction. If you aren’t familiar with the term it is fiction stories written about characters from an original work of fiction created by fans of the original work as opposed to its creator. Pretty straightforward in concept. But

Permit us to recount a recent travel misadventure, though whatever eventual connection we draw to today’s case will be specious at best. Last Friday, we traveled from Philadelphia to Hartford, Connecticut for a deposition.  We were fresh off of a long flight home from Europe and were hesitant to take on a couple hundred miles

Today’s post is another guest post from friend of the Blog Kevin Hara, of Reed Smith, who channels our resident movie critic in this wide-ranging discussion of pleading and procedural weirdness.  As always with our guest posts, the author deserves 100% of the credit, and any blame, for what follows.

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If ever

It took a while for courts to catch on that implied preemption in drug cases depends on whether the plaintiffs can present “newly acquired evidence” of a relevant risk, but the argument seems to be gaining some traction. The first case to recognize the “newly acquired evidence” argument was the First Circuit’s Marcus v. Forest

Last year’s list of the Ten Worst DDL cases was remarkable because all ten decisions came from appellate courts.  Yikes.  And it is not as if the bad appellate decisions were spread around.  Two came from our home circuit, the Third.  Two came from the reliably problematic Ninth Circuit.  But the ‘winner’ was the Eleventh