Last week we posted about the need to consider the level of detail and specificity you include in any filing. We happened to stumble across another case that prompted a word to the wise – proofread, proofread, proofread. Today’s case is a defense victory in the battle between state and federal forums, but perhaps more

This post is from the non-Reed Smith side of the blog.

When we say Nebraska, what comes to mind? Cornhusker football? Warren Buffet, the Wizard of Omaha? Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show? Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom? An amazingly haunting album by Bruce Springsteen? As the Jersey Girl blogger on this site, it should be

Last month we brought you word of an excellent result (preemption) in a ridiculous case − a class action claiming that the drops in eye-drops are too big.  That decision was in accord with an earlier decision likewise dismissing such claims on preemption grounds. See Thompson v. Allergan USA, Inc., 993 F. Supp.2d 1007

“Legal conclusions, though, are not entitled to the assumption of truth.” If that were the only point we could take away from Wright v. Howmedica Osteonics Corp., No. 5:17-cv-459, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 168785 (M.D. Fla. Oct. 12, 2017), we would be satisfied.  We understand notice pleading and such, but we have seen all

Implied Preemption.  Off-label promotion. TwIqbal.  They make up a core of our posts, yet we never seem to tire of them.  Maybe our readers, especially interlopers from the other side of the v., tire of reading about them, but we can often find a wrinkle in a case that merits our huzzahs or inspires

We harbor a suspicion that half the drug/device tort cases we encounter are really medical malpractice cases in search of a deeper pocket (thank you medmal damage cap statutes).  We’ve said before (e.g., https://www.druganddevicelawblog.com/2008/10/everything-you-need-to-know-about-wyeth.html) that both Levine and Riegel were really med-mal cases.   That search for a deeper pocket is undertaken by the lawyer,

The district court’s order dismissing claims in Ebrahimi v. Mentor Worldwide LLC, No. CV 16-7316, 2017 WL 4128976 (C.D. Cal. Sept. 15, 2017), is a good antidote to the Ninth Circuit’s wrongly decided opinion in Stengel v. Medtronic. Stengel is where the Ninth Circuit held that the plaintiff avoided express preemption by alleging