We have promised ourselves that we will stream this week’s “This Is Us” episode when we finish this blog post.  We love this series beyond reason, and we dread its imminent demise, notwithstanding the title’s grammatical transgression.  (We generally condition any sort of allegiance on correct use of predicate nominatives.)  We are struck, over and

In general, people do not like to have to repeat themselves.  It is unavoidable.  Sometimes your audience is rightfully (or wrongfully) distracted.  Sometimes you aren’t that clear.  Sometimes you lose your zoom audio connection and have to start over.  Sometimes you don’t notice your daughter’s earbuds are in and that she’s been watching a YouTube

In the movie Thank You for Smoking, lobbyists for the tobacco, alcohol, and firearm industries got together periodically at a DC watering hole to swap stories about the challenges of representing unpopular clients under increasing scrutiny by the federal government.  Hilarity ensued, along with some other stuff we do not remember very well.  Of course,

One of the intriguing things about cases decided by a jurisdiction’s highest court is that pronouncements by such courts can often have far-reaching implications.  Sometimes they pan out, as the application of the First Amendment to the FDA’s ban on off-label promotion seems to be doing following Sorrell v. IMS Health, Inc., 564 U.S.

We refuse to end the year on a bad note, so we’ll talk about a case that’s good – not good enough to make tomorrow’s top-ten list, but good enough to slam the door shut on 2020 with a reasonable amount of cheer.

Vicente v. Johnson & Johnson, 2020 WL 7586907 (D.N.J. Dec. 21,

We haven’t see too many of these.  The reason for that is the gadolinium litigation is practically a textbook example of where federal law ought to preempt state-law product liability claims of all kinds—including both design defect claims and failure-to-warn claims.  Just search gadolinium on the blog and you’ll find plenty of cases dismissed on

Last year we posted about two major decisions by the New Jersey Supreme Court finally chopping the Accutane inflammatory bowel disease (“IBD”) litigation down to size.  Our post here contains links to all of our posts over the years on the Accutane litigation.  The point of note is that to get to those two decisions